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Thanks to Mike and Barb for the track and arrangements (Bob Mac also) to once again enjoy this events. Annual steam up deep in the heart of Lancaster County, home of the Amish...horse and buggy and the best homemade Root beer floats! Shot in HD format, so adjust the quality through the option bar.
 

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Charles

Nice compilation. I missed the portable saw mill demo and the guy with the ultra-light. We were lucking in having the rain all pass to the south both days. Thanks to you, Ryan, Bob McD, Mike and Dick Moore, and Rob Kuhlman for keeping the tracks busy. We even had a local "walk on" appear with his Ruby; thanks for running with us Noah. I was really interested in a couple of Rob's new Ga 0 cars [from the 20s or 30s IIRC] that were plywood bodies with printed paper overlay sides. This event is lots of fun because the young kids are interested in things mechanical but also very well behaved around the track.
 

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How did the Amish like it? I know they are very scarce of the. Ideo cameras and technologie. Also the o scale look like it has been run hard, how much use has it had? Thanks for the video
 

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P1987

Most of the 0 gauge stuff was from the 1920s and 1930s. Mike had one newer loco with freight cars from the 1940s and 1950s.

The "old order" Amish and Mennonites have interesting rules about public interaction with people outside their group. I think the stuff regarding cameras and having pictures taken is related to images of individuals more than groups. The rules governing use of technology is decided by the elders in the individual churches, so there is wide variation in what is [and is not] done. There is also a significant difference between the strict practices of the "old order" Amish and the Mennonites who often drive automobiles and no longer paint the chrome trim black.

Our occasional challenge was talking to younger children because they often do not learn English until they start grade school. If you attend a show like cabin Fever Model engineering Expo in York PA, you will see hundreds of PA Dutch at the show.
 

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That looks like it was a fun Show! The people were as interesting as the trains! We have a few Amish in northern Maine too. It is cold in the winter but good farmland in Aroostooc county
 

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Posted By Dr Rivet on 06 Aug 2012 07:37 AM
"Our occasional challenge was talking to younger children because they often do not learn English until they start grade school."

Jim
If I recall correctly, the native language spoken throughout this segment of the population is Swedish (not that I understand or speak it) of which most everyone utilizes it in their conversation unless spoken to by someone using English. Seems everyone there enjoys the heritage of machines relative to have things are done (in particular the "hit and miss" engine making that ice cream throughout....I sure would like the recipe for that mix along with the home brewed root beer- emphasis is on the beer:zing and kick to it)

As to photo/videos we were not informed of any restriction or general guidelines.

Jeff
I guess you will be missing Labor Day Steamup?
 

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Charles

They are descendents of Swiss, not Swedes. And most of Switzerland speaks either German or French, although there are some local dialects spoken by small groups of people. In the canton of Graubunden [home of the RhB] many in that canton speak Romanche [sp?] which is unique to that small area.

So...no... they speak a variant of German, not Swedish. I only know because I specifically asked the question on Friday when we were setting up.

The group that sponsors the Shirktown Threshing Day is the Swiss Pioneer Associates and the funds raised support the restoration and maintenance of the Peter Martin log cabin. Peter was the grandson of Swiss immigrants who came to Lancaster County PA around 1740. He lived in the cabin until he moved to Canada in 1816. Back around 2000 the group was formed to save the remains of the cabin. It was dismantled and the pieces stored in a truck until the current site was offered for reconstruction. The cabin was first opened for display in 2010.

More than you wanted/needed to know... except that we are supporting a good cause in historic preservation.
 

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Posted By Dr Rivet on 06 Aug 2012 07:37 AM
P1987

Most of the 0 gauge stuff was from the 1920s and 1930s. Mike had one newer loco with freight cars from the 1940s and 1950s.

The "old order" Amish and Mennonites have interesting rules about public interaction with people outside their group. I think the stuff regarding cameras and having pictures taken is related to images of individuals more than groups. The rules governing use of technology is decided by the elders in the individual churches, so there is wide variation in what is [and is not] done. There is also a significant difference between the strict practices of the "old order" Amish and the Mennonites who often drive automobiles and no longer paint the chrome trim black.



Our occasional challenge was talking to younger children because they often do not learn English until they start grade school. If you attend a show like cabin Fever Model engineering Expo in York PA, you will see hundreds of PA Dutch at the show.






I will say if there is one group I'd want to be around in a SHTF scenario it's the Amish! Unlike the rest of us, the domesticated tv watchers, at least they still know how to milk a cow, raise a chicken, and grow food! That has to be one of the best steam up vid's I've seen. i wish I was there!
 

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Jim
Thanks for the "brief" on the background and language...goes well with the visual overview of the events this weekend.
 
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