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Dry transfers are basically a Lacquer process. This is teh reason they are hard to get now, as Lacquers are being phased out. Anyway, they will work as any lacquer paint would and need to be protected as such. Wood could be a problem from the back side as it accepts moisture and humidity.
jonathan
 

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Master of Disaster
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I have used dry transfers from woodland scenics routinely. I have left cars outside in the elements and I have noticed that even with sealing they seem to dissappear.

So as long as you don't leave them outside they will work fine...if left outside I don't think so.

You will have to reapply after a time.

My 2 cents

Bubba
 

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Agreed


Although I like the effect of sun and rain on the dry transfer decals it's not for everyone. I haven't used my vinyl decals outside but those that have are pleased with how they stand up to the wx.


Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Although I do like the worn look after being outdoors, it will only get worse. Vinyl? Any ways to make it NOT look like new (in time)?

Thanks for the input thus far. What about this idea...

What if the 'sign' was printed on paper, then plastic laminated, then sprayed matte on the front/ exposed side? The edges would be sealed and protected by a frame. The backside adhered to cedar. The matte spray coat to avoid the gloss/ reflective look.

What would a sign painter charge for a 10"w x 2"h lettered sign?

Hmmm, tbug
 

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Posted By tbug on 10/15/2008 9:12 PM
... Vinyl? Any ways to make it NOT look like new (in time)? ...


Hmmm, tbug


While vinyl does not lend itself to things like scraping it with a saw blade to distress it, you can weather it with paints, etc. and then seal the weathering with clear coat. All of the vinyl I use has a matte finish. No shiny stuff.
 

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If you have a laser printer you can create your sign with Paint or any text editor and print on paper the size you want. Laser print inks last better than ink jet. Or create the file and take it to a copy shop to print it for you... or print it with an ink jet and have the copy shop (or the copier at the drugstore) dupe it with a laser copier.
 

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Posted By tbug on 10/15/2008 9:12 PM

.............. What about this idea...

What if the 'sign' was printed on paper, then plastic laminated, then sprayed matte on the front/ exposed side? The edges would be sealed and protected by a frame. The backside adhered to cedar. The matte spray coat to avoid the gloss/ reflective look.




UV is the killer.


Dave
 
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