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I have been working on learning Fusion 360 using YouTube videos. Using the 1912 Locomotive Dictionary I drew up a driver in Fusion. This is my 4th attempt.

I did not draw in all the details as I think they would be lost in 1:29 scale. The driver drawing is for a 72" driver but I resized it for a scale 69" driver at 2.38" using the calibrate feature. I am using the drawing as typical drivers as cast by Baldwin Locomotive.

I did not add the counter weights yet.

61147

61148




DrivingWheelFusion360.jpg
 

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It's looking really good. I love 360. I moved from 123 Design to gain the sculpting tools. No flange yet?
 

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It's looking really good. I love 360. I moved from 123 Design to gain the sculpting tools. No flange yet?
I did not add the flange as that will be a separate part. My idea is to print the wheel and press on a metal driver tire.

is there a standard tire profile? I have not found one in my limited searching online.

Rick
 

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There appears to be one on your sketch. If you are printing abs you might want to consider brass sleeves in the 2 holes also.
 

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Rick,
The G1MRA 'Standard Gauge 1' measurements have worked well for me over the years.
The flanges may be a little large for 'scale', but they work really well over most track work, even if not perfect.
You may find that 'scale' flanges are a problem on some railways if you plan to use the loco other than on your own railway.
Cheers,
David Leech, Delta, Canada
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Rick,
The G1MRA 'Standard Gauge 1' measurements have worked well for me over the years.
The flanges may be a little large for 'scale', but they work really well over most track work, even if not perfect.
You may find that 'scale' flanges are a problem on some railways if you plan to use the loco other than on your own railway.
Cheers,
David Leech, Delta, Canada
David,

Thank you, this is the information I was looking for.

Rick
 

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Rick,
I've been trying to learn Fusion360 also - I found the official training videos and help menus very unhelpful (par for the course with Autodesk). I have also been trying to trace some old engineering drawings in the hope of "digitising" them for CAM (mainly for a British 2-6-0 that my Grandfather designed for 5" gauge in the 1950s).

My biggest problem with this is dealing with "snap" and keeping lines and objects parallel and on-grid while tracing a partially-dimensioned drawing as closely as possible (paper, especially tracing/draughting paper, is not stable and distorts over the years): I thought I knew how to do this through many years of amateur-Autocad and then they came along with Revit which seemed to do grid/snap perfectly, even in 3D. Fusion360 seems to be a huge backward step in terms of this :-( I'm ready to give up and try a simpler product instead although I love many of the features of F360.

I know I should persevere really - that's the only way with Autodesk products in my experience - they've always struggled with their computer-human interface (CHI) and you always come away with the feeling that it's deliberate strategy for making more money with continuing education (I had a friend who worked on their CHI in the 1990s and she kind of confirmed this suspicion ... she left in disgust at the lack of progress she could make). Perhaps Youtube can liberate us from this mindset?

Anyhow, I digress - did you find any specific Youtube posts or channels helpful for the project you are tackling? Or did you just search randomly?

Thanks,
Andrew Smith
San Francisco
 

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Andrew,

I like the Product Design Online Learn Fusion 360 in 30 days playlist. https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLrZ2zKOtC_-DR2ZkMaK3YthYLErPxCnT- That helped in learning Fusion. I use the calibrate tool on the canvas to scale the drawings. You can use the parallel constraint in Sketch mode to make sure objects and lines are parallel. One trip up I have is that AutoDesk changed the CHI interface in Fusion 360 in 2019 so the screenshots in the older videos are different.

I am slowly getting there and have spent many hours doodling to try to learn how to do things. It does require a mindset shift to think in 3d. I need to work on getting 3 views aligned in Fusion 360.

Are you drawing for CAM as live steam or electric?

Rick
 

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Andrew, Autodesk produced a program called 123 Design. It’s no longer supported but is still available for download here and there. It’s a much simplified version of 360. It lacks the history functions among others. It is very easy to use. Currently, I’m using 360 for the sculpt engine but have found 123 perfect for 90% of my projects. Lots of YouTube videos.
 

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Thanks for the pointers all. Here's the sort of thing I was trying to digitize - tracing a scanned pencil drawing into F360. But ran into problems with things not being quite parallel or snapped accurately to, say, 1/32" when I tried to match this up in 3D with a front or rear elevation. I need to take the class on "sketch constraints" I think. I did use "calibrate" to get the overall scale right as my Epson flatbed scanner seems to take some liberties with accurate scale. This is for a 5"-gauge coal-fired model that was half-constructed by my grandfather (has been half-constructed since around 1965 - he liberated some good machine tools from Germany in 1945 and this project was the result. I thought I could make a bit of progress for my generation before passing the project on to my kids ...

Apologies for stretching this forum's definition of "Large" :) I do have a collection of live-steam and electric in 45mm gauge also but have not yet ventured into scratch-building for myself in that scale, other than buildings.

I'll post some more here if I make any progress.

61167
 

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I do my sketches in abobe illustrator, save them as svg files and import them as sketches in 123 or 360. As an example, I did a flat cross section of the bullet train I’m making, imported it and extruded it in the 3d program. To ensure quality, I do half the cross section, copy and paste in place then mirror and join the 2. I was able to get the basic car shape in 10 minutes or so. Illustrator is industrial strength but any vector drawing program will work as long as the svg export is available.
 
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