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Some years ago, while browsing in a book store, I came across a glossy booklet with a title something like "Build a Two-Door Railroad" that showed how to build a fold-away G-scale layout on two hollow-core doors. Unfortunately, I didn't but it then and now I can't locate it.
Does anyone happen to know of this booklet or where I could get it?

The critical information would be how to hinge the doors and join the track.

Our club exhibits a 6x8' "Thomas" layout at train shows.
Today at a show a lady asked how we built it. We simply drape a custom tablecloth over three banquet tables supported by inverted buckets, to make a "toddler height" layout.
But it occurred to me that the same concept could be realized with hollow-core doors,
with a painted-on landscape.
I'm thinking a plan like this might be a way go from a Christmas train set to a railroad hobby.
 

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Dr.,

A standard hollow core door is 70 inches high (6'-8"), and come in standard widths from 24" to 48" (I think). A standard door hinge with a removable pin would make a perfect joint, allowing quick assembly and disassembly and maintain perfect alignment. I recommend attaching the pins to one or the other door to keep from loosing them. Electrical connectivity between door sections can be accomplished with standard automotive connectors available at auto parts stores, Walmart, etc.

Using the door hinges as attachment points between doors I don't believe attaching the rail at the joint would be necessary, so long as the power is carried between the two (or more) door sections. If you feel it necessary to physically join the rails between doors, I would recommend using Split-Jaw connectors for that service.

So long as you don't cut the hollow core door's length (70"), you could produce any shape layout you wish.

As for the book, I am not familiar with it, but I would imagine the layout on the hollow core doors was something akin to either the Inglenook or Timesaver switching layouts.
 

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'Door Hollow' railway...that is a lot of doors!

Years ago, my dad gave me a stack of hollow core doors from a rental that were in poor condition. I took leftover bits and scraps from other projects and turned them into tables, mostly for use out in the greenhouse, though there's one I use for a modeling bench.
 

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The layout was featured in a Model Railroader special Christmas issue in the 1980s, and also included in one of the MR books that feature project layouts. It was on the cover of Jim Kelly's book "Fun With Electric Trains." It isn't a long article, but you can find the book on Amazon (link below). I own the book, and the article is decent.

https://www.amazon.com/Fun-Electric-Trains-Started-Railroading/dp/0890241007
 
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