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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve been thinking about using an 18 or 20 volt Dewalt battery to power my rails on an LGB outdoor railroad. Amazon has an adapter that takes the battery to a positive and negative wire, and with a 5012N throttle I’m thinking there’s a chance... Is there a sparky that has done this? Do I create any type of shock risk or damage to equipment? And what would a standard dewalt 20 volt max batteries amps be equal to? Cutting the cord would open up options for my layout and make running it in the background much easier.
 

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You can do it, but the battery packs take extra space. Are you really saving money? Since your batteries should last you 5 to 7 years, is it worth it?

Greg
 

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Is there a sparky that has done this?
We usually put the batteries inside the locos, with radio control, so they can operate independently. As Greg said, you can do the same thing for the whole layout. But why? A regular power pack will also work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don’t want to convert my locos to battery and my entire tool collection is dewalt, so I’ve got batteries. I’m tired of using an extension cord, and would probably relocate where my control station was if I didn’t use a cord. The question isn’t should I it’s could I. I just don’t want to hurt or break anything and it would be nice to get an idea of how much power it can provide.
 

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My Ryobi batteries are clearly marked with amp hours, are yours not? Many discussions on the board regarding how long one lasts running your trains. I have heard of others using tool batteries, sure, why not if you have them.

Jerry
 

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I’ve been thinking about using an 18 or 20 volt Dewalt battery to power my rails on an LGB outdoor railroad. Amazon has an adapter that takes the battery to a positive and negative wire, and with a 5012N throttle I’m thinking there’s a chance... Is there a sparky that has done this? Do I create any type of shock risk or damage to equipment? And what would a standard dewalt 20 volt max batteries amps be equal to? Cutting the cord would open up options for my layout and make running it in the background much easier.
I ran an outdoor track from batteries some while ago - I used 3x 6V sealed lead acid batteries in series and it worked well so don't see any reason why you couldn't do it with rechargeable tool batteries. Just be sure to use a fast fuse or breaker in the circuit - lithium batteries can deliver very high currents if short circuited and can weld things together or cause burns in the event of a short circuit. Most regular power supplies for outdoor tracks have built in short circuit protection.

As to capacity, tool batteries typically range from 2AH to 6AH. I don't know what maximum current they can deliver but it will more than you need.

Robert
 

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Li-Ion cells typically can discharge at C1 at rated voltage for 60 minutes... C2 will work for 30 minutes or so.

A 2Ah battery should provide 2.0A's for 60 minutes. A 6Ah or 6000mAh battery will provide 1A for approximately 6.0 hours.

I don't know for sure but suspect power tool batteries have integral protection circuits typical of our train Li-Ion batteries.

I wouldn't use any larger inline fuse than you need...

Michael
 

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Li-Ion cells typically can discharge at C1 at rated voltage for 60 minutes... C2 will work for 30 minutes or so.

A 2Ah battery should provide 2.0A's for 60 minutes. A 6Ah or 6000mAh battery will provide 1A for approximately 6.0 hours.

I don't know for sure but suspect power tool batteries have integral protection circuits typical of our train Li-Ion batteries.

I wouldn't use any larger inline fuse than you need...

Michael
The Li ion batteries I use in my garden and power tools all have overcharge and undercharge protection additionally they have a temperature sensor that shuts down the battery if it gets to hot eg in my lawn mower if I push through long grass.

As for using batteries instead of an extension cord running out into the garden with all the inherent issues like being a trip hazard, having to roll it up etc.
If the batteries are available then that seems like a good idea to me it would make the control centre a self contained unit and more portable at the end of the running day if it is put away at the end of the day .
 
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