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Discussion Starter #1
OK you smarties.

I was reading last night ,, yes I do read captions.
any way they said a train was heading into a 10 degree curve.

I know radious and dia. I even know how to figure degrees when cutting rafter tales.
So in our small world of 10 ft radius curves. (20' dia)
WHAT WOULD A 10 degree curve be???

thanks
 

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A Steamed Elder
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10 degrees equals 19 feet, 9 and 3/8 inches radius, according to Stan's Converter ( in 1/29).
 

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Posted By NTCGRR on 03/10/2009 5:06 PM
OK you smarties.

I was reading last night ,, yes I do read captions.
any way they said a train was heading into a 10 degree curve.

I know radious and dia. I even know how to figure degrees when cutting rafter tales.
So in our small world of 10 ft radius curves. (20' dia)
WHAT WOULD A 10 degree curve be???

thanks



In the real world, meaning 1:1 scale, measuing the radius of a curve would entail stretching a line several hundred feet long which would be difficult given the weight of the line, and trees, gullys, mountains, houses and other objects getting in the way.
So, they measured out some distance along the track and noted the angle formed at that distance from a tangent at the starting point. That angle then is the degree of curvature. Early on, each railroad (or track contractor) used whatever distance was convenient for them, such as 50 feet, 100 feet, 25 yards, or 10 chains, etc. Thus one railroads 10 deg curve might be 8 deg or 15 deg for some other railroad.

I think that today, the distance is 100 feet.
 

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Semper,

Again according to Stan's Handy Converter, 10 degrees is about 573.69 feet in full size.
 

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Posted By gary Armitstead on 03/10/2009 5:40 PM
Semper,

Again according to Stan's Handy Converter, 10 degrees is about 573.59 feet in full size.



Posted By gary Armitstead on 03/10/2009 5:40 PM
Semper,

Again according to Stan's Handy Converter, 10 degrees is about 573.59 feet in full size.



Take a straight track and starting at some point begin a uniform curve with a radius of 573.59 ft. A straight line to a point on that curve that is 100 ft from the starting point will form a 10 degree angle to the straight track.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Woow, thanks
I had one eye pop out while tring to read that first one. Then I got a head ach.

I always thought a 20' rad. would be great on a modern double track main.
 

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OK, the ultimate answer:

"10 degrees is just that". So if understood then so be it.

Pull out a protractor.... measure 10 degrees offset. Move protractor 1 degree forward along the line and once again measure 10 degrees forward offset.


Call me when you get through the curve...



Second option..... get the garden hose out and ball park it....

gg
 

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Posted By GG on 03/10/2009 7:02 PM
OK, the ultimate answer:

"10 degrees is just that". So if understood then so be it.

Pull out a protractor.... measure 10 degrees offset. Move protractor 1 degree forward along the line and once again measure 10 degrees forward offset.


Call me when you get through the curve...



Second option..... get the garden hose out and ball park it....

gg




Sorry, GG, using the protractor would depend on the diameter of the protractor... besides, how "LONG" is a degree (that one you said to move the protractor forward)?

But I agree... get out the garden hose and ballpark it.

Then again, the first time I layed out mine, I used graph paper scaled to 1/4-inch to the Foot and drew it with my highschool drafting class compass. Then I gave up on that and drew it using my computer and Microsoft's PAINT program (the freebie with Winders) scaled to 1 pixel per inch, but I had to set the display to 1040x680 to get it to fit all at one time on the screen.
 

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C.T.,

I'm going to try something wih my CAD program. I hope I understand your premise. I'll draw a radius of 573.69 thru two pointa on a 100 ft. straight line-thru the endpoints of the 100 ft. line. Correct? I'll get back with the answer.
 

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Posted By Semper Vaporo on 03/10/2009 7:12 PM
Posted By GG on 03/10/2009 7:02 PM
OK, the ultimate answer:

"10 degrees is just that". So if understood then so be it.

Pull out a protractor.... measure 10 degrees offset. Move protractor 1 degree forward along the line and once again measure 10 degrees forward offset.


Call me when you get through the curve...



Second option..... get the garden hose out and ball park it....

gg




Sorry, GG, using the protractor would depend on the diameter of the protractor... besides, how "LONG" is a degree (that one you said to move the protractor forward)?

But I agree... get out the garden hose and ballpark it.

Then again, the first time I layed out mine, I used graph paper scaled to 1/4-inch to the Foot and drew it with my highschool drafting class compass. Then I gave up on that and drew it using my computer and Microsoft's PAINT program (the freebie with Winders) scaled to 1 pixel per inch, but I had to set the display to 1040x680 to get it to fit all at one time on the screen.











Semper, you kill me with your wit...

OK, the diameter is a function of the square root of the radius multiplied by the abismus of the cosyn of the radius. As such the length of the length of the degree is relative to the perspective of the protractor.



Get my point? Think switches and misguided ones....



Clearly demonstrated is the lack of abismus of the cosyn of the radius...


gg
 

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Posted By Semper Vaporo on 03/10/2009 7:12 PM
Posted By GG on 03/10/2009 7:02 PM
OK, the ultimate answer:

"10 degrees is just that". So if understood then so be it.

Pull out a protractor.... measure 10 degrees offset. Move protractor 1 degree forward along the line and once again measure 10 degrees forward offset.


Call me when you get through the curve...



Second option..... get the garden hose out and ball park it....

gg




Sorry, GG, using the protractor would depend on the diameter of the protractor... besides, how "LONG" is a degree (that one you said to move the protractor forward)?

But I agree... get out the garden hose and ballpark it.

Then again, the first time I layed out mine, I used graph paper scaled to 1/4-inch to the Foot and drew it with my highschool drafting class compass. Then I gave up on that and drew it using my computer and Microsoft's PAINT program (the freebie with Winders) scaled to 1 pixel per inch, but I had to set the display to 1040x680 to get it to fit all at one time on the screen.











Semper, you kill me with your wit...

OK, the diameter is a function of the square root of the radius multiplied by the abismus of the cosyn of the radius. As such the length of the length of the degree is relative to the perspective of the protractor.



Get my point? Think switches and misguided ones....



Clearly demonstrated is the lack of abismus of the cosyn of the radius...


gg
 

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C.T.

I just layed out a radius of 573.69 with endpoints going thru a line with a length of 100. The angle checks at 9.99992 degrees. Pretty close to what Stan gets on his converter. I did the layout using MasterCAM software.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
woow, now I'm seeing double?????

Its 8:30 pm and my cardboard pizza (dinner) is ready, thats how busy I am.
 

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Marty,

I believe that C.T. was saying that the 100 ft. chord is always used as the basic for the angle. My layout checks pretty close to the Converter. I'm not about to do the math. To late in the day for that. AND I'm too old! I have a headache now!


Actually you can lay it out in feet, inches or miles. The angle will always be the same.
 

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Semper... foot note here.

" How LONG" is also a Chinese person...


My argument is so strong here. the garden hose concept wins.


gg
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Funny how a thread goes on with out me.. hope this one does not get locked also.
I get the idea. I think????
 
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