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No, this is not an April Fools Joke.... Nor is it Photoshop... This image was sent to me by family in Medicine Hat. I find it to be very unexpected!!! It is obviously a Meyer -the question is -is it alone? I would have expected a Mallett -but never this!!!

Does anyone have any information on this?

regards

ralph
 

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Ralph

The CPR developed the first articulated locos in Canada in 1909 for helper service on the "Big Hill" between Field and Revelstoke BC. There were 6 0-6-6-0s in all, numbered 1950-55. The first 5 were introduced as compounds but no economy was found. The last, number 1955, was the first simple articulated. According to Chief Mechanical Officer H H Vaughn, the cylinders were placed head to head to shorten the dry pipe associated with the lead cylinders.

Another interesting feature is that each of the locos was superheated. The initial loco, number 1950, had a large square box mounted on top of the boiler above the cylinders to give access to a Horsey-Vaughn superheater, vertically mounted between a boiler divided into two. This was unsuccessful and teh loco was rebuilt with a more conventional superheater similar to other members of the class though it did retain the large box atop the boiler.

No particular economy in operation was found and they were very costly to maintain. As a result, they were rebuilt in 1917 to class R2 2-10-0s.

These were the only articulated locos ever attempted by the CPR who thereafter used rigid frame locos for climbing the Rockies.

I do not know the specific characteristics of a Kitson-Meyer but these locos have always been referred to as either compound or simple articulateds depending on which version was being referred to.

Regards ... Doug
 

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Definitely a Mallet. Notice the cylinders.

I love it!
 

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Ermm..

The High pressure cylinders and Low pressure cylinders are in the centre of the bogies and also notice the pivot for the front bogie is not a hinge and slide arrangement. This makes it a MEYER configuration -not a MALLETT. It cannot be a Kitson Meyer because the firebox is not located between the bogies -it would also pre-date the Kitson patent anyway!!!

regards

ralph
 

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Posted By ralphbrades on 04/07/2008 11:45 AM
Ermm..
The High pressure cylinders and Low pressure cylinders are in the centre of the bogies and also notice the pivot for the front bogie is not a hinge and slide arrangement.




Are you sure? I would have said that the "saddle" just ahead of the #2 axle looks like a Mallet sliding support to me. Other than the front engine being "backwards" I would say it looks like a pretty standard compound single articulated 0-6-6-0 Mallet. The rear engine certianly looks to me like it's rigidly attached to the boiler (or vice-versa, technically).
 

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Oh. I was thinking of "Mallet" in terms of "Compound."
 
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