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Hi,
Recently I was looking at some pictures of the Lahaina, Kaanapali & Pacific Railroad and noticed that their turntable is completely covered.  You can't see the pit at all.  I would guess their turntable is like that for safety but how often in the days of steam were turntables built like this?  And why???  I have seen pictures of this style before but not often. Just for reference here is a link to what I am talking about:
http://www.travelnotes.de/hawaii/maui/plkpr01e.htm
I would think this type would be easier to model (there is my lazy side sneaking out again/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/unsure.gif)
Matt
 

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I'm sure they were covered whenever safety required it. The LK&P is a tourist road, and from your picture it would seem that proximity of the passenger station to the turntable almost mandates the pit be covered. Just my guess, of course.
Dawg
 

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In Europe, many were covered. I have a VERY nice 1:87 scale one in H0e from Hapo, just long enough for an Austrian U class loco's wheels (the rear and front overhang) to sit on (smaller than a coster).

Seeing the history behind this railway, maybe European practice at hand?

EDIT:  Hapo's website for more photos and ideas: http://www.hapo-bahn.de/
 

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Hi,


Why build them like that? Well almost like that - because its cheaper and as you say safer. Here in the UK the plastic kit maker Dapol has a flat turntable kit that is I think a western region design (before that is wad the Great Western Railway). Hidden underneath the cover in your photo would possibly be an inverted girder, that the track sat on.


Here is a scan from the Dapol catalog of their kit; reverse the side girders for what will be underneath the planked top.
 

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Cheaper?  /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/unsure.gif

Not sure how they would be in the 1:1 world.  More expensive (cost of table AND the lumber for the cover).
 

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Matt,

In this particular application it was surely because of the close proximity to the depot platform. In fact it appears that it is part of the platform. Traction lines used such turntables in streets to turn cars. The San Francisco Powell Street cable cars at Market St. are turned on a turntable like this also.

Some early roundhouses were built completely around the turntable with everything roofed over, turntable and all. Such a floor covering the pit was most useful for moving around inside and certainly safer.
 

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Rich,
I was trying to remember where I had seen a covered turntable besides in Mau`i. That was in S.F. I know one thing, the turntable at the Honolulu depot was not covered, but then it was not easily accessible to the public, so I would guess safety was the the issue.
 

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Posted By Richard Smith on 01/17/2008 5:46 PM

Some early roundhouses were built completely around the turntable with everything roofed over, turntable and all. Such a floor covering the pit was most useful for moving around inside and certainly safer.


A good example of this is at the B&O Railroad Museum
 
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