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Been working on my 2-6-2 prairie, got the space below the fireman finished and cleaned the wheels on the tender and engine. Being as this engine has been sitting for a while I figured I better lube it up, and good thing as in the gearbox area I found it covered with a white substance, more like flakes and dust and plenty of it on the gears and body of the gear box. So I pulled the motor block assy out so that I could examine the top side and it was even worse. Found the culprit was the lead weighs at both ends of the motor housing. They had oxidized and the flaky oxidization was covering just about everything. So a good cleaning with plastic safe electronic cleaner and new oil ( trying some new stuff called liquid bearing ) got it all back together to test. No go, nothing so started checking and found that not only is the new lubricant very slippery it is also a very good electrical insulator, and I mean very good. Of course most oils are same but even after wiping off surfaces with a clean rag I was still unable to get a ohm reading thru the electrical contacts. So back with the electronic cleaner and testing. finally everything was in working order then finding a bad motor and replaced it, now having a running engine. Cleaned the lead weights off and spray painted them with a rattle can. The engine has been sitting in the garage for sometime and it is rather humid here in Florida and guess the moisture just got to it especially with the hurricane last year. So be careful with the led weights and lubricate sparingly, Bill
 

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Not only that, you're also near the salt water and that can corrode things MUCH FASTER than anything. :(


When I lived in Melbourne, FL. I had corrosion issues with all kinds of things :eek: that would take much longer to corrode in Orlando.


I've not had any corrosion issues with any of my train weights in Orlando, but I sure did in Melbourne!:eek:



When I moved back to Orlando, many of my loco's were being stored for close to 10+ years in an outside storage unit, non climate controlled. Had no issues at all in all that time of being stored, and that was through some hurricanes too.


I really think the salt air in the coastal towns in Florida and the humidity combined really do a number on things in those areas. Don't know if any of the sea side counterparts up north have any of these issues like this, as I don't believe they have the kind of humidity we have here in Florida.


I really think the humidity combined with the salt air in the Florida coastal towns is the real culprit. In those areas best to store your trains in an climate controlled environment if at all possible, like inside your house in a spare bedroom, if you have one.


Fortunately I do, and that's where my trains reside, inside my house, and only go outside when I'm ready to play trains.;):)
 
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