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It is imperative that you use transition tracks. Each track section should take up 2-4 degrees of the total grade difference. The 1015s will work fine for two axle cars and short wheel base engines (like the two LGB cog locomotives). If you want to use 4 axle cars in your train I'd use LGB 1000 sections (1 foot) for the transition tracks. Back when I had a rack on my railroad in Denver, I also beveled the two end sections. I tapered the rack for the first 1.5 inches. There was a noticeable "clunk" when the gear on the engine made contact with the rack. Tapering the the first part of the rack section made all of the difference. Rather than using the special hooks on the LGB hook and loop couplers, I cut off the part that hung down and hit the rack, since I had a set push pull train that went up and down the grade. If the grade is too steep, you might have to wire the couplers in place as they tend to ride up over each other.

I enjoyed having the rack. I had the overhead wire connected to the transformer (with a reversing circuit) so I could run the engine through the pantagraph.

If you have a significant grade on your layout a cog RR is a neat addition. Unfortunately, my present yard is flat and I would have to make a mountain out of a mole hill.


Cheers,

Chuck N
 

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I think that a single long piece of track would be better than a series of short tracks. The change wouldn't be nearly as abrupt. Just spread the curvature over as much of the track segment as you can. I don't use SS track so I have no idea as to how difficult it would be to get a controlled bend in the vertical, rather the the horizontal.

Chuck N
 

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I can't say anything about transitions tracks on Mt. Washington, but one thing that I remember is that there were no couplers between the engine and the passenger car. Gravity held them together throughout the trip.

Chuck N
 

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When I took the Mt. Washington train back in the dark ages (about 1963), there was nothing connecting the engine with the car. The engine pushes against a iron"?" plate on the end of the car.

It is a very steep incline, and there is never any place along the route where there is level track.

Chuck N
 
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