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Discussion Starter #1
This is directed primarily at those of us who typically run our trains in a loop. For those that might run prototypically or in other ways, when you set the locomotives on the track, do you usually place it on facing left or right? Now you might think this should end up being 50/50, but my experience is that there is a definite preference amongst all the garden railways I have seen. Why? Is it a left-handed, right-handed issue?

Keith
 

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I have noticed this, most things seem to run clockwise, but I noticed that I tend to design things counterclockwise, and then started looking at other's layouts and they seem to be mostly counterclockwise. Weird.

Well, we will see how the poll proves out.

Regards, Greg
 

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I run counterclockwise also... most of the time....

Its kinda how I designed the layout to run...

I answered the poll question incorrectly as I confused myself...

see my layout is indoors and you stand in the middle of it... so to the left is counterclockwise for me...

Philip
 

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I found that I have a bad habit of going clockwise with my old layout so on the new layout that I am building now it will be all DCC with as many reverse loops as I can fit .......

now my only worrys is the head on's that can happen .....
 

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Straight line all the way! ;) :D

With point to point there is little choice. hehe! There will be no preferred direction once the other terminal with its turntable is completed. Trains will originate on one end, head out and do enroute switching, switch at other end, turn engine for return trip, so there will be equal in each direction.

The only preference I would have were I still operating a loop would be counter-clockwise if I had a Shay. I would definately want all that cylinder action facing me when the lokie was closest.
 

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I'm with you Richard. The IPP&W runs point to point and I am building my own Northland the same way. Locos run equally in both directions.

Regards ... Doug
 

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Umm..

I run clockwise on the way out and counter clockwise on the way back, my railroad is a figure 8. But, I usually put the trains on the track so that when I am looking at them from the start, they run to the right...under the bridge, then clockwise to the bridge, the counter clockwise back to the start...

I answered counterclockwise, just to be difficult!

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Interesting you say that about the Shay Richard...I do the same thing so I can see the cylinders most of the time when running my live steam Shay. Originally our loop was designed with live steam in mind, but eventually was also electrified and now I'm DCC but still run the steamers too occasionally. We have been thinking about running in both directions, as Scott mentioned, but have to build some new passing tracks first! We seem to have enough collisions even running in the same direction!!

Keith
 

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My track "was" (presently dissassembled for major reparis to the elevated structure) two loopbacks that were supposed (never got around to it) to automatically throw the switch when exiting the loop so upon returning to it the train would go the other way, so the direction through the loopbacks would be 50/50 clockwise/counter-clockwise.

But, as built, with slip switches, no matter how I put the engine on the track it always eventually became a counter-clockwise operation in both loopbacks.

Also, due to the design of the steam up siding it was better to make it face to the right so the cars could be put on the parallel straight mainline; then, upon leaving the siding in the forward direction to the main and then backing up on the main, coupling to the train would be on straight track (a more ideal situation than coupling on the curve).

In the diagram below, the straightaway is about 50 ft and the loopbacks are about 17-ft diameter (and thus about 53-ft of track), making about 156 ft of running track. I want to "FILL" the center of the loopback nearest the house with a turntable and 3/4 Roundhouse.
 

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Charles,

How did it always end up as ccw running? That's exactly the layout I used for my Lionel train when I was just out of college. The switch would line itself as the loco entered, from either the divergent or the straight section when running through as a trailing point switch. Next time around, the direction was reversed because the switch had been thrown previously.

It was a fun kind of a layout to operate because the trains would run around the loops both directions!

Mark
 

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Posted By markoles on 10/23/2008 2:39 PM
Charles,

How did it always end up as ccw running? That's exactly the layout I used for my Lionel train when I was just out of college. The switch would line itself as the loco entered, from either the divergent or the straight section when running through as a trailing point switch. Next time around, the direction was reversed because the switch had been thrown previously.

It was a fun kind of a layout to operate because the trains would run around the loops both directions!

Mark



Lionel switches automatically switched to whichever route the train approached from and stayed in that configuration until the train approached from the other route. That is what I wanted to make my switches do but never got around to setting it up (got the motors, sensors/magnets and wire, but no power available yet). Mine are always set for the straight route but if the train approaches from the diverging route the points just slide over far enough to let the flanges through and then slide back, remaining set for the straight route. A dangerous situation in that if the train has started through the switch from the diverging route, the train cannot move backward until ALL the train is through the switch.
 

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When I built my layout I created one leg of my figure 8 with a steeper incline than the other leg so it just happened that when I run my trains so they will go down the steep incline and up the gradual one they are running clockwise.
 

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We tend to run the "main loop" with the leap frog counterclockwise. The primary reason is based on the directions of the turnouts (leading point vs trailing point), the chances for one fouling seem smaller pulling the heavyweights in this direction (i.e., fewer derailments at the turnouts). It also gives us more options as to how the trains leave the leap frog (i.e., on the same track taking the same path, or on different tracks that take different paths). Clockwise, they must both take the same (only available) path.

Interesting that the "trestle loop" appear to run clockwise when these trains receive the same voltage as those running counterclockwise on the "main loop." This is because the trestle loop is actualy an over-under figure 8 and for most of the viewing you see the leg that heads the "other direction."

We tend to run the "service loop" (where trains slow and stop for diesel/coal/water) in a counterclockwise manner when running diesels but clockwise when running steam because of the way the reed switches are laid out by the various facilities.

Ultimately, we run 7 trains (four on loops and three P-T-P) with 23 blocks each accessable by any of three controllers. Also, the railroad incorporates a wye so any train or combination of trains can run either direction and be turned without an act of God. Furthermore, any train can be operated P-T-P between any two facing sidings on the railroad because all sidings are diode protected and each of the three controllers has its own reversing circuit built into the control panel. In this way we don't need to "double gap" our rails to run P-T-P.
 

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And...sort of related...

How smart is Your Right Foot?

Just try this. It is from an orthopedic surgeon............

This will boggle your mind and you will keep trying over and over again to see if you can outsmart your
foot, but...you can't. It's programmed in your brain!

1. While sitting where you are at your desk in front of your computer, lift your right foot off the floor and make clockwise circles.

2. Now, while doing this, draw the number '6' in the air with your right Hand. Your foot will change direction.

I told you so!!!

And there's nothing you can do about it! You and I both know how stupid it is, but before the day is done you are going to try it again....if you've not already done so.
 

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Posted By Bruce Chandler on 10/23/2008 8:31 PM
And...sort of related...

How smart is Your Right Foot?

Just try this. It is from an orthopedic surgeon............

This will boggle your mind and you will keep trying over and over again to see if you can outsmart your
foot, but...you can't. It's programmed in your brain!

1. While sitting where you are at your desk in front of your computer, lift your right foot off the floor and make clockwise circles.

2. Now, while doing this, draw the number '6' in the air with your right Hand. Your foot will change direction.

I told you so!!!

And there's nothing you can do about it! You and I both know how stupid it is, but before the day is done you are going to try it again....if you've not already done so.


WELL... Not quite!

I tried so hard at keeping my foot going clockwise, I drew the number 9.
 

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Outside loop--usually counterclockwise.
Inside loop--usually clockwise.
 

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Counterclockwise. Because of drowned man curve. Too fast around that turn and you have a very wet loco. I'll run clockwise but the grandkids don't get to.

Craig
 
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