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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everyone

I live in Central Florida where the summer afternoon showers can be quite heavy. Being that my back yard is pretty much flat with a solid cement wall running the length of the back-line, I can easily end up with 1-2 inches of standing water at times. It's gone shortly after the rains stop. I'm thinking of using 8 inch cement blocks laying on their sides. I will then fill in each side with either dirt or rock. (Undecided as to which at this point.) For the elevated section, I would add a second or third row of blocks. Again filling in with dirt or rock. Along with keeping the track from being flooded, the higher track elevation will make working on the layout easier on the old back and knees.

Does anyone have any experience with this type of construction?

Thanks

Randy
 

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I'm not sure if I understand your method Randy. You say that you are going to lay the block on their side, which would place the openings facing you when viewing the block straighton. How do you propose to keep the dirt or rock in the openings? Wouldn't it tend to settle out onto the surrounding area?
 

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Randy
Your idea has been done many times using different typs of Block or Pavers. It is not uncomon. Just make sure the ground under them is solid and level. They may settle in a little over time but a little adjustment and they will remain flat. If you want the dirt to say in and around them Mix a little portland cement in the dirt. Add a little concrete color if need be then once the dirt is in place wet it.
The cement will activate and hold the dirt in place. That is how I do my Ballast.
 

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I was going to dabble with the concrete block method but figured in my case it would move too much. I have alot of clay ground here and when it gets wet......it will move VERY easy. I'm going with concrete roadbed all around for my new RR. I poured a test slab about 2 weeks ago and no issues so far with that. I poured it about 2 inches thick and Im going to pour the majority a little thinner on the rest of the railroad but where the problem areas are I will make it thicker. Im also reinforcing it with 3/8" rebar in the middle of the slab.

Its a little permanent but overall I think I wont have to worry about heaving as much as I would otherwise. It should heave together for the majority.... Marty C. has a article on here on how to do it if you have interest.
 

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I have a combination of cast concrete & paver block roadbed. Where I used the paver blocks, I previously had a years old right of way originally made with the foam & ballast method. After several years, pulling up the track & removing the foam basically results in the trench & fill with ballast method. If I was starting from scratch, I'd probably do a little trenching first, then fill with ballast (1/4 minus), lay & level the blocks, then track, then ballast on top. I'm in a fairly mild climate too (Oklahoma), so I haven't had any problem with frost heave moving this roadbed around. Now my dogs are a different story... one of them likes to dig. :-0

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craig
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies

I was planning to lay the blocks on their sides so the blocks wouldn't hold moisture. Dirt or rock would be filled into the openings. Mixing in some mortar sounds like a good idea.
 

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are you talking 8"X8"X16 block? how about flat paver stones? may be cheaper.
 
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