G Scale Model Train Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I planted this years ago but I don't remember what it is.



My best guess is some sort of dwarf elm.


It has resisted my best attempts at neglecting it to death. I'd buy more of them if I could figure out what it is.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,510 Posts
Of course, you realize that with my extensive horticultural experience, I am eminently qualified to tell the difference between a living plant and a brick and in my estimation what you have there is definitely NOT a brick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,384 Posts
Hopkito or Seiju elm. (The smaller of the two and I can never remember which is which.) If they get stepped on, like some of mine, they grow back as bushy clumps. The leaves and areas with lack of leaves look elm-like to me. Very hard to kill and I have 10+ year old specimens the size of a fist.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,716 Posts
How 'bout this one:



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
It's about 6" across. I don't recall ever seeing any flowers or fruits on it.

It is definitely NOT a brick.

The leaves on the cotoneaster are too far apart.

I'll go with the elms for now and see if the guy at M&M recognizes those names. The durability and size match Todd's description pretty well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,384 Posts
Posted By George Schreyer on 03/10/2009 4:19 PM
I think that Todd has come closest. It is probably a Hokkaido elm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulmus_'Hokkaido'

The Seiju is a little larger but still looks like a very nice option

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiju_elm


The elms don't flower. The Seijus do loose most of their leaves during the winter though. Both are very nice options and near impossible to kill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
this one doesn't loose it's leaves over the winter, the lead photo was a winter shot.

The preponderance of the evidence indicates that it is a Hokkaido elm. The leaf structure says that it is an elm. It is very small, hardly grows at all, tolerates full sun, is tough as nails and retains it's foliage over the winter. The "tough as nails" part especially appeals to me considering the degree of my horticultural skill (nil).


I went by M&M this afternoon and they don't have any but they will check with the suppliers to see if they can get some. I also stopped at a couple of places about a half mile north on Tustin Ave and they didn't have them either, nor would they claim that they could get them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Pretty good. They've got the stuff organized by sun tolerance and they had quite a variety. The prices are not great but then again, most nurseries don't sell cheap
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,384 Posts
Posted By Greg Elmassian on 03/11/2009 9:18 PM
How was the selection at M&M? I've got it on my plant place list, but never made it there...

Regards, Greg

They are about 5-6 miles from me. If you go there, stop in for a visit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
The final evidence is in, I got two more at $12 each and the new ones are identical (besides being half the size) to the existing one.

The new one is in the pot at the right. This picture is about full size.

 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top