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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Back again

CHAPTER 5[/b]

Back again, we are getting closer to something that will look like a Caterpillar 60. I had to take some time out and install my new compressor and air lines and build a new paint booth. My old paint booth was built for “O” gauge stuff and just wouldn’t cut it for Large Scale. While I was at it I replaced my 25 year old air brush as well, not much learning curve there as the new is identical to the old.

I’m still trying to locate a few last minute items like thread/string of the correct size and texture to represent cable on the winches. Also can’t seem to find any cable hooks of the right size, looks like I will have to make them as well, probably from brass bolts. Waiting for the weather to warm and dry before I start painting, so started on a flat car and a loading car for the Cats to use and display on.

Well enough whining, on with the pictures and excuses in chapter 5.
The radiator core is a piece of ¼ inch plywood cut to size and wrapped with Styrene pieces to build up the correct shape. The radiator sides are channels and the cast in “SIXTY” is down in them. The only way I could figure out to do them is to mount the “SIXTY” lettering to a thin strip and glue in place when finished. The shroud is layed out and cut ready to bend up, the prototype used a square to round style shroud but there just isn’t room enough on the model to do it correctly, especially in Styrene



Ooops, another fuzzy picture, oh’well. You can see the shroud with collar mounted is installed on the back of the radiator with some angle pieces as closures along the sides.



The fan blades and hub were a bit of a challenge but came out pretty good. The blocks are glued up (one is laying on the square) to shape the upper tanks from. You can just see the bolt detail on the radiator top plate and the pins as mounting bolts for the shroud (more of that modular system for easy removal to paint).




Here is a shot of the rough fitting of the radiator assembly to the chassis and making sure the fan lines up with the hole in the shroud.




The upper tank has been shaped, fitted, and installed, the radiator cap and hose outlet are also in place.



The front view of the same thing. I have added a piece of “shade cloth” to the front of the radiators; the texture is very similar to the tubes and fins of the prototype.





Same view again with the upper and lower radiator hose and piping in place. Notice the piece of “shrink tubing” on the inlet pipe of the water pump, again for easy removal to paint.




The radiators are pretty well finished except for final detail and assembly so we move on to other parts and pieces. Here a tool tray and further bolt detail have been added to the operator’s deck. This also gives a better view of some of the seat detail.



The “bumper” has been built up and installed on the “Logging Cruiser” version and the Caterpillar lettering test fit to the front radiator tank.



The brush guard frame and screen is test fitted to the front of the Logging Cruiser.



The final test fit installation of the Logging Cruisers brush guard.




Well that’s all for “Chapter 5” nothing left to build but the winches, blade, and cable dozer assembly, hopefully you will stick around for that.

Thanks for your time.
Rick Marty
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Thanks for the compliments guys.

Jerry I'm glad that it may inspire you to do some more.
Lord knows I have been inspired by you and many others
postings on this forum through the years.
Later
Rick Marty
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Thank you Richard.
Are you going to Sonora on the 18th?

Hi Mario,
I use Styrene rod, 1/16 in this case for most of my rivit/bolt detail. I drill a hole and insert a rod and cut it off long, then use solvent glue to weld in place.
After the solvent is cured I file them to length and sand the end in a rounded shape. It is actually faster than it would seem after you get going.
It is the best method, for me, that I have found. It is easy to layout the pattern with a pin prick then drill, The rivits stay put.

Thanks for your time.
Rick Marty
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
CHAPTER 6[/b]
[/b]
We are moving along now. In this “chapter” I’ll cover the winches and the dozer blade. I have done a lot of looking on the internet for a clear description and pictures of a winch manufacturer that made the winch that I described in the first chapter. No luck finding a brand name, on this model. I found a lot of winches made by Hyster, Willamette, and Carco but none of them were of this style. All of these winch brands were after market and produced in the Pacific Northwest and used on Caterpillar 60’s. I settled on the CARCO brand name for one simple reason, the name fit on the back of the winch.


On to the pictures.


Here is the rough form of the winch, built up from styrene, wood, and brass, shapes, with the two drums and two Fairlead sheave blocks. Also you can see the, in and out of, gear levers, with the Black Hand grips.




Here the test fitting and drilling and taping of the mounting bolts to the back of the cat. As you can see the winch drums are driven by “hidden” gearing in the rear case of the Cat’s final drive.
At least that’s what I’m claiming.




Here is a similar view but with the operators seat in place to check the winch clearances. You can also see a test fit of the lettering on the seat back, some more of Stan Cedarleaf’s decal work, after the paint is on.




The winch clutch operation handles have been installed and set in their bracket behind the seat. The sheaves and guides have also been installed in the blocks of the Fairleads.




A different view of the same things but also showing a test fit of the CARCO lettering on the back of the winch. See what I mean about the name fit?




The Blade. This sub assembly was a little more complicated than I had thought it would be, it ended up consisting of many more pieces than I had anticipated when I first looked at it. After considering my options to get the roll in the blade I went to the shop and cut a piece of 26 Ga cold roll and sandwiched it between two larger pieces of waste in order to get it through the slip rolls. The blade curve came out very close to what I was after so I cut a couple of end pieces and filed to fit. The blade on the RD 40 at Phillips Mill has a very heavy/wide bottom plate (my prototype for this) and a piece of .40 X ¾ brass bar seemed to be just about the right size.





Here the brass bottom plate has been fit and soldered in place, a piece of brass tubing has been added across the top to give the thickness and strength (looks only). The cutting edge made from a strip of galvanized 24 Ga. has been soldered across the bottom leading edge.




Here is a better view showing the assemblies described above.




The lift pulley and sheave has been added to the center of the blade and the main push beams are in place. The wood block was used to raise the blade bottom when fitting the push bars so that it would drop slightly below horizontal when let all the way down.




The blade pusher bracing has been soldered in place and the blade reinforcement, made from styrene shapes, has been added. Also a strip of 2 ½ lb lead sheet has been added to the top of the bottom plate before the styrene braces were put in place. This was for extra weight to assure that the blade would hold the cables taunt.





That’s all for chapter 6. All that is left to fabricate is the cable dozer rack and that’s going to take some head scratching.
Thanks for your time.
Rick Marty
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
LAST CHAPTER[/b]

Well here we are at the end of this tractor build. I know it was too long and drawn out and for that I apologize. Not to worry this last section is short and to the point.

The “Cable Dozer” rack I’m modeling, if you remember from the first installment, is a homemade affair on a Cat RD 40 at the Phillips Steam powered sawmill here in the area.
For those that are not familiar they were called cable dozers because a cable and winch drum was used to raise and lower the dozer blade. Without hydraulics obviously there was no down pressure of the blade, only gravity, that is why the blades were built so heavy, please see the previous chapter and chapter one.




The following views show the cable rack in stages of construction. As you see it was built up of brass shapes and odds and ends of other metals. Here you can see the rear pulley at the top of the wishbone; the cable comes up from the winch drum and around that pulley then down the center of the hollow square tube to the front pulley.




This picture maybe a little clearer view of the framing and pulleys that make up the hoisting mechanism.





This picture shows clearly the hollow center tube that the cable travels through and the front pulley and sheave block that does the blade lifting. Note that front block is a double pulley. The line comes out of the tube over one pulley down to the single pulley on the blade, around it then back to the other pulley on top then back down to a solid connection at the blade.






Well like I said, short and to the point. Here is a couple views of the Cats being test fitted to the flat car before it was bashed, see my thread “Flats for Cats” for information about the transport of these Cats. Now it’s time to tear them back apart and get them painted, weathered, and connect all the final rigging.






Thanks for your time, I sure enjoyed this project, I hope you did too.
Rick Marty
 

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Rick,

I won't be going to the Sonora meet this year for the first time since they began. Due to the conflict of the PCR convention at Fremont it is my understanding that several of the very few vendors that attend Sonora will be at Fremont instead as will probably the majority of Bay Area modelers that comprise a very large amount of the attendees at Sonora. I'm afraid it may be a washout this year and I hope it doesn't do in the West Side meet which, while small, has always been a favorite of mine.

Your Cat is outstanding by the way. I like the San Leandro markings too. A very good friend of mine worked as a draftsman there for many years and I have visited there while the plant was still intact and operating several times.
 
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