G Scale Model Train Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
937 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm working on designing my first building. I want to build it on a base so in the winter I can pick the whole thing up and move it indoors for protection. Also I can bring the whole building in for repairs if needed. I plan on laying down a pad of either concrete or pavestones for the building to sit on, and then cover it with dirt or other natural material to hide the base.

Does anyone do this? I'm looking for the best material to use for my base. I thought about 1/2" plywood soaked in sealer, but if anyone else has a better idea I'm all ears.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
383 Posts
Use Hardi-Backer.
It's a masonry based product used for a barrier board for bathroom tile installation.
3/16" to 1/4" thick, and sturdy...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,702 Posts
I used 3/8" PVC board from Tap Plastics (forum sponsor). They even cut it to the exact specs I needed before shipping, and they shipped the very same day.

The Hardi Backer that Duncan mentioned can be cut easily by scoring it and then snapping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
I've been doing most of my structures from kits so far. Some have a base built in, others don't. My village changes so I did not want to make them permanent. Instead I just use stepping stones sunk into the ground as a base in the locations I want the buildings (also helps to keep out the little black ants). I have run landscape lighting to about 30 locations, so the buildings have to be open on the bottom for the lights to go in.

I used Hardi-Backer to install tile in two bathrooms. I had not thought about using it outside, but it sounds like a good idea. No question the PVC board will work for a base also.

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
BTW, the winter is realtively mild here in Virginia, so I don't worry about bringing the structures inside. I would have no place to put them anyway. My biggest dangers are dogs, and the branches falling from the trees. My dog stepped on a building and flattened it, but its a plastic structure so I can just glue it back together. A few years back a rather massive branch came off a mature oak tree and landed on a concrete pagoda. The pagoda broke into a pile of pieces.

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
I use one inch blue styrofoam and color it with latex paint. Drive 2 inch drywall screws thru the underside and push into the ground. This will hold it in place and will allow you to level it. You only need 2 screws to accomplish this. My 2 cents worth, Dennis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I use hardibacker or the Hardi- exterior sheathing which has a stucco like appearance finish.:) I paint them brown or green or whatever color I need, attaching the structure to the base plate using a good silicone selant and then mop diluted Titebond 3 on them to put grit or stone dust or stripwood ...whatever is needed to complete the scene.

We had 35mph sustained and up to 50 mph winds gusts yesterday,/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/crazy.gif and I like to use landscape fabric pins to anchor the base plate to keep the buildings in Texas and not rolling or flying away to OZ./DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/laugh.gif Just drill the HB about 3/4" in with a 5/32" bitin a couple of places and put one side of the pin thru and tap down. It's worked so far....../DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/satisfied.gif

Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I build all my buildings out of Precision Board (High Density Urethane) and use Hardibacker board for a base. I've never had a problem and it's fairly inexpensive and readily available. I have even used Hardibacker for track underlayment.

Tom Rey
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
467 Posts
I am with Duncan and some others. Hardibacker is the best. I put it under my switches also. It won't float like foam, and it don't fly very well either. It basically is cement. Just don't step on it. It will snap when you step on it. Someone said there is some hazard from cutting it with a carbide blade, but I don't know what the hazard is. I just try to stay out of the dust.
Paul
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top