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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here’s my first update for 2008. The initial builder’s log can be found in the MLS archives.
 
As seen in an earlier message (archive page 6), the wheel castings have a large sprue to remove. 

 
Using my portable bench vice, I had good luck with using a jeweler’s saw and bench grinder to get rid of most of the sprue material.
I cleaned up all 18 wheel castings required by the Locomotive and trailing car before going on to the lathe for final machining.

 
As I posted earlier I decided to use a simplified process to do the machining, here’s the first step:
  1. I held the wheels by their tread in a 3-jaw chuck and cleaned up the backside surfaces of the wheel where the sprue used to be. The backside’s center hub was faced-off and trued-up to its diameter of .5165”.

 
More later!
 

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Hi Howard,
I’ve been following your post from the beginning and thoroughly enjoying them. Have you considered taking all of the old post that are archived and putting them together in the new “Builders Log” section of MLS? I have just finished doing this with my posts and it’s a simple matter of cutting and pasting. All the photos transfer without any special code work.
Keep up the good work.
Joel
 

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Joel, I agree once you figure out the process it is really quite easy. I did mine by calling up the archive in a seperate window the just went back and forth copying and pasting from the old to the new. I eliminated the chit chat and did some editing to make it a little more readable. The whole thing including the learning process took about 6 or 7 hours, with 3 or 4 of those being the learning curve for the new format. I do kind of like the old system with the running comments, but the builder's log makes for easier reading for someone who is not interested in al the chit chat.
 

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Hi Howard:  Very nice wheel turning there.  That Sherline looks like a very capable machine for Ga 1 work.  Castings can be tricky to turn sometimes, but it look like you have it "dialed in"

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
WInn....it's taken a lot longer to do the machining than I anticipated.  I've taken the advice of you and others to heart....take it slowly and carefully. As a result, I haven't made any scrap yet.   If I ruin one of these wheel castings, I can't get a replacement unless I order a minimum of 10 wheel sets; enough to justify the casting run. Soooo, I'll just take it slowly.
Appreciate your inputs. 
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Bob....I'm really satisfied with the Sherline products and their service.  These castings appear to be 1st quality, so I shouldn't have any major alignment problems with the setup.  Thanks for your nice comments.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
When I finally get around to the boiler building, I’m going to need a way to do the hydrostatic testing, so I picked up a bronze casting for a boiler feed pump. This pump reportedly can give me up to 400psi. This is part of a kit from A&K Enterprises, known as A&K Railways on eBay. Additionally, the kit included a full sized drawing, O-rings, check valve balls, gaskets, clevis pins and all the metals needed to machine the other parts. Under $25 and made in the USA, too boot.


More later!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I recently received an email from an ex-owner of a Keith Mannison-built Class A Climax locomotive, which he now regrets selling.  He's considering building a new Climax locomotive.  Anyway, he has forwarded some pictures of the locomotive and I thought I’d share them.  It was one of Keith Mannison's locomotives that spurred me on in buliding my Class A.







 

Nice..thanks and welcome to MLS.   I always like to see pictures showing the details...helps a lot!!

 
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It has been awhile since I updated this builder's log. I've been spending a good amount of time designing and acquiring parts for adding Digital Readouts (DRO) to my Lathe and Mill.
I decided back in February to get input from other MLS members of the making of my own lubricator, even though I had already procured a Roundhouse lubricator. With the increased fuel carrying capacity and boiler water level detection, I envisioned that the steam oil capacity may now become the limiting factor to long runs. SO, I set out to design (with lots of help from others here on MLS) a metered deadleg lubricator, with a drain....one where I could see the oil usage and be able to readily increase its oil storage capcity, if needed. Here's a link to the Deadleg Lubricator thread: http://www.mylargescale.com/Community/Forums/tabid/56/forumid/11/postid/10398/view/topic/Default.aspx and for the purpose of this builder's log I'm also posting the drawing of the lubricator here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, after about 5 months of putting this project on the back burner while I built a steam powered Model-T Rail Truck, http://www.mylargescale.com/Community/Forums/tabid/56/forumid/11/postid/27647/view/topic/Default.aspx
I’m finally getting started again.
I’ve done some rethinking about my original plans. They originally called for a trailing car that would carry the locomotive’s only gas supply. It was also to carry an auxiliary water supply to be pumped into the boiler via a WLDS and pump. Instead of having to finish the trailing car before getting the locomotive running & on the tracks, I will be making the locomotive self-sufficient by adding an on board gas tank placed in the fake water bunker. Since I will eventually finish the trailing car, the source for fuel will be controlled by a set of valves (manifold) that will direct the fuel to the boiler’s burner from either the trailing car or the on-board gas tank. This requires the design and building of 2 on/off gas valves, a small manifold and the moving of Kevin O’Connor’s butane gas control valve from the trailing car to the locomotive itself.
Secondly, a valve controlled steam takeoff will be added to the boiler for the possible heating of the water surrounding either of the gas canisters and the steam valves manifold, if needed.
My first actions are to bring the existing designs up to my current thinking along with a new design for the on board gas canister enclosure, the gas valves manifold and the steam dryer assembly.
Here’s a sketch of the gas canister’s on board enclosure with the placement of the gas valves manifold:

Here’s my working drawing of the gas valves manifold:

And finally, the steam dryer assembly. As suggested in an earlier message by Harry Wade, the dryer assembly needs to be easily replaced. He also suggested
“In order to get the tube out of the firebox, is to make a core drilled bronze (or brass) header block, so that the Stainless dryer coil ends goes directly into the block without bends and the exterior side of the block has your two exterior connection points”. This should avoid making abrupt hairpin bends in the tubing. To this end, I will be machining a brass header to accept the stainless steel tube ring to fit just inside the firebox adjacent to the burner’s flame and the appropriated fittings necessary for easy removal & replacement. Here’s my drawing:

This will require silver brazing stainless tube into the brass header. So, if anyone has any suggestions on the techniques for brazing stainless to brass will be appreciated.
So, while I’m waiting for the order I placed for supplies/metals I need for the above, I will make some more progress on the bogie frames, the axles, the drive line/universal joints, then machining of the wheels.
Once the universal joint parts were removed from the casting sprues, some additional cleanup cutting & filing was required. Then the barrel was turned down, chucking up on the barrel’s sprue, to fit the inside diameter of the rings. Then that sprue was parted off. The newly turned barrel was chucked up and a 1/8” hole was drilled & reamed through the center of the barrel to fit the final driveline. A hole was drilled & tapped through the side of the barrel for set screw to secure the barrel to the driveline.


The universal takes the 2 sets joined together with a short piece of square brass channel slid over the square shanks. Here I’m showing one side of the universal assembled and the other side ready to assemble.

Each of the Locomotive’s 2 bogies have 2 shaft hanger castings through which the 1/8” driveline and 3/16” axle passes and is designed to keep the 2 gears (a 40 toothed spiral beveled crown wheel & a 20 tooth pinion) in 90 degree alignment. The shaft hanger’s hole for the axle is reamed to .1890” for a running fit, while the driveline hole was reamed to .1285”, also for a running fit.
On each 2 1/2” x 3/16” dia. axle, a keeper bushing was machined from brass rod to keep the shaft hanger in alignment (½” OD x ¼” wide with a 3/16” hole for the axle.) The keeper bush will has a set screw for securing it to the axle.

The axle length turned out to be very critical. In the design of the bogie, there’s no easy way to assemble the side frames with the upper pivot bolster in place along with the axles, consequently at the point in the assembly process where the axle & wheel assembly is placed in the journals, little or no play is available for the axles to slip into the journals. The 2 ½” axle is just 1/64” wider than the space between the journals. With the spring bolster, springs & bogie end stretchers (brake beams) removed, it still takes considerable twist exerted on the remaining bogie frame parts to allow the axles to pop into place.

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Posted By Kovacjr on 09/15/2008 6:29 PM
Some good looking trucks!
Did you machine the gears or were they bought machined. Dont remember seeing anything on them before.

Thanks Jason. Gears are still way beyond my skill level, but I have visions of making some someday. I got these from DJB Engineering out of David Bailey's remaining stock of parts for his Class A Climax Locomotive kit production. His kits were available starting in about 2000 and there are about 80 of his locomotives running. His castings are 1st quality as you can see by the pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Posted By David BaileyK27 on 09/16/2008 1:48 AM
I have been asked for more truck castings including the gears, so I will be making a further run, please let me know if you are interested so I can make up a decent quantity for the caster.
David Bailey www.djbengineering.co.uk



Hi David....nice hearing from you. As a matter of fact, I am interested in 2 more of your bogies, since I will be building a trailing car. I already have enough of you wheel castings.
I'm assuming that'll include the following:?
CL001 Bogie Sideframes
CL002 Top Bolster
CL003 Bottom Bolster
Pivot Bolster
CL005 Brake Beams 45mm
CL006 Crown Wheel (machined)
CL006A Pinion (machined)
CL007 Cross Drive bearing (machined)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
With the exception of finishing the machining on the wheels, the bogies are done & mounted on the frame. I’ll still have some adjustments to make the gears mesh properly. I've been having some problems getting them to work smoothly.

Here’s the pivot bolsters as finished back in Nov. 2007:

A ¼” hole was drilled through the frame stretcher to accept the pivot bolster’s post. The bolster’s 2 attachment holes were threaded with a 6-32 tap. Brass bolts were used to secure the pivot bolster using the holes drilled through the oak stretcher.


And the assembly:



I haven't decided on whether I'll chemically blacken the frames or paint them. Whaddyall think???
 

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Hi Howard: Good to see you back on the air with the Climax. It is really tempting to build one of these based on your work and observations.

Those bronze castings look like they machine very well.

I would chemically blacken the frames. There appears to be a lot of nice texture on those parts that paint would fill over. Kind of an artist's view.

Thanks, Bob

(edited, can't seem to spell tonight)
 
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