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I just ordered a roundhouse bertie. Anyone have some suggestions on where to get some british style cars that are smaller to pull behind it?
 

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The stuff from IP engineering looks pretty cool, but it all seems to be 64 mm which does not work for me since I use 45 mm. Too bad.
 

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Posted By csinc on 11/05/2008 12:35 PM
The stuff from IP engineering looks pretty cool, but it all seems to be 64 mm which does not work for me since I use 45 mm. Too bad.


Ivan Prior [IP Engineering], a fine gentleman of my acquaintance and well-known eater of other folks' sandwiches, does not make models for Gauge 3 - the 64mm that you mention. Every one of his extensive range of models is designed to to be used on 32/45mm gauge track.

just to make sure, I'll just have a look at his web-site, just in case he is pulling a fast one.

Nope.

Still 32/45mm track stuff scaled for 16mm to the foot operations, or thereabouts.

GRS, on the other paw, DOES a very fine range of models for 64mm [standard Gauge 3].

tac
www.ovgrs.org
 

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Posted By csinc on 11/05/2008 12:35 PM
The stuff from IP engineering looks pretty cool, but it all seems to be 64 mm which does not work for me since I use 45 mm. Too bad.


What the Illustrious Mr Foley didn't point out is that they are all different scales. 64mm is the original gauge-3 datiing from the dawn of model railways. 45mm is gauge-1. (And yes, there was a g-2 but it died.) Using gauge-3, standard gauge models work out at 1:22.5 scale, which is exactly what LGB picked for their meter-gauge (narrow gauge ~39") models. That was the start of the scale/gauge confusion about 25 years ago.

There happen to be a lot of 2' narrow gauge railways in England, so modellers started using 32mm (gauge-0) track, as mechanisms and track were readily available. This worked out to be 16mm = 1ft scale, so they called it SM32 (Sixteen Millimeter scale, 32mm gauge.) The other way of describing it is as 1:19th scale; the same as 16mm=1ft.

Almost all UK models that are 32/45mm are made to this scale. The Brandbright and Perfect cars will fit your loco, but the 64mm gauge-3 stock from grsuk are models of standard gauge coaches, so they will look a bit weird.
 

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" modellers started using 32mm (gauge-0) track, as mechanisms and track were readily available. This worked out to be 16mm = 1ft scale, so they called it SM32 (Sixteen Millimeter scale, 32mm gauge.) The other way of describing it is as 1:19th scale; the same as 16mm=1ft. Almost all UK models that are 32/45mm are made to this scale. "


If only!

In a further twist, stock labelled "16mm" can be all sorts of actual scales - or indeed a combination of scales in one vehicle. True-scale 16mm is still growing, but does seem to be a dwindling proportion of the whole.


However that is to advantage in this particular query.

Roundhouse locomotives are to various scales, and most are distorted so that they will fit both 32mm and 45mm gauges. Rolling stock kits from IP Engineering are deliberately scaled to be a visual match with Roundhouse locomotives.


People with true-scale locomotives are sometimes bitter and twisted about it, but it does make the train look all-of-a-piece.

David 1/2d
 

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Actually, by far the majority of two-foot gauge railways are in Wales, where the prolific number of slate quarries and coal mines, as well as other industries associated with them, as well as local transport, used this tiny gauge and its equally tiny locos. As Mr Thornton points out, 16mm to the foot works out to 1/19th scale, but it is never referred to by this scale, just called '16mm'. The excellent association - with its equally high-quality monthly magazine - is well-worth joining if the interest catches you. Even the biggest 2 foot gauge locos built in this scale - the Accucraft NG/G16 Garratts, can be run on the tortuous curves associated with tiny trains in tiny backyards that are pretty common here.

Such little trains are not only pretty cheap to buy in the first place, but they are easy to carry about, too. Their chunky appearance and simple lines have great appeal over here, and it seems, to a certain element in the US and canada as well. Mr Horowitz' own layout uses much that would be instantly transferable to UK, and even the name of one of his station [ Lizard Weston] is a play on words - Weston-under-Lizard is not only a village with a stately home - or maybe the other way around - but Weston Park has a substantial narrow-gauge railway in it, too. The redoubtable Mr Jeff Young is also a well-published fan of railwys with a NG British feel to them.

tac
http://www.ovgrs.org/
 

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also a well-published fan of railwys with a NG British feel


And then there's Peter Jones and his "Scribblings" column in the back of Garden Railways magazine, who has introduced many US modellers to UK narrow gauge railways - most of his models seem to be SM32.

I dabbled for a while, but I've now transferred my direction to the EBT in Fn3. Here's my Roundhouse 'Argyll' on 45mm track (even though Mike's portable layout has dual 32/45mm on that loop.) The coach is a GRSUK kit (highly recommended) and the brake van (caboose to you) was made from a much-modified bachmann boxcar.

 

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Posted By Pete Thornton on 11/06/2008 12:15 PM
also a well-published fan of railwys with a NG British feel


And then there's Peter Jones and his "Scribblings" column in the back of Garden Railways magazine, who has introduced many US modellers to UK narrow gauge railways - most of his models seem to be SM32.

I dabbled for a while, but I've now transferred my direction to the EBT in Fn3. Here's my Roundhouse 'Argyll' on 45mm track (even though Mike's portable layout has dual 32/45mm on that loop.) The coach is a GRSUK kit (highly recommended) and the brake van (caboose to you) was made from a much-modified bachmann boxcar.



Mr Thornton - my point was to note the American followers of British narrow-gauge, not the British contributors like Mr Jones to whom British narrow gauge is the be-all and end-all hobby.

tac
www.ovgrs.org
 

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my point was to note the American followers of British narrow-gauge

Tac, I understood your point. But as Peter Jones writes in an American magazine, he is addressing American followers.
 

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And remember that many of the Roundhouse locos are much larger than SM32 scale, and a few makers make kits to match the overscale locos.
 

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Some additional 16mm/1:19 resources;

If your interest is long term ...
Association of 16mm Narrow Gauge Modellers
http://16mm.org.uk/index.htm


Suppliers:
Cooper Craft
http://www.cooper-craft.co.uk/index.html

PERFECT WORLD
http://www.perfworld.freeserve.co.uk/

Triassic Model Works
http://www.westherts16mm.org.uk/pdf/TRIASSIC Cat V4 2 Aug 2007.pdf

AnDel Models
http://andelmodels.co.uk/index.php

Manufacturers and Suppliers Directory
http://www.ukmodelshops.co.uk/

Binnie Engineering
http://www.atelier-vaporiste.com/WWW2/show_man.php?man=BE&lng=en

Model Engineers Laser
http://www.modelengineerslaser.co.uk/

Slater's Plastikard Online
http://www.slatersplastikard.com/index.htm

Steam And Things
http://www.steamandthings.com/fpage4.htm


Groups:
The Association of 16mm Narrow Gauge Modellers: Bedfordshire Area Group
http://www.bag16mm.org.uk/index.htm



Reference:

Narrow Gauge Perspectives:
http://narrowperspectives.ukgeeks.co.uk/
( A collection of photographs featuring narrow gauge railways in the British Isles.
There are also some pictures here of minature railways. )




( I've become a little interested in 16mm too. )
 
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