G Scale Model Train Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I forget what brought this question up. Biker boots
that have the buckle on them are called engineer boots.
I always thought the engineer was a guy laying out a curve or shooting grade with a transit. But could it be that these boots were made for locomotive engineers?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,334 Posts
I have a 18 in tall pair of Engineer boots from Wesco in orgegon. I always wear them when working on my RR. Laying track Moving rocks Setting Grades. Mostly because Sneaky Snake tried to attack me once. I see him this year and I got a new hat band that rattles when I shake my head.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,716 Posts
On the other hand, I do my railroading barefoot. Depends on what's practical where you are:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
Found this in wikipedia. It claims they were worn by surveyors or "engineers". Hope it helps

Similar to harness boots, engineer boots are a type of motorcycle boot: footwear usually worn by motorcycle riders. The boots are most often made of heavy weight black leather, have a rounded toe and range in height from short (10") to extra high (38"). The most typical height is between 10 and 18 inches.

Engineer boots are designed to protect the motorcycle rider from injury to the foot and leg in the case of an accident while riding and to prevent burns of the rider's calves from the heat of the motorcycle parts while riding. They may include a built-in steel toe cap and metal shank in the sole, and often are double layered with leather for stiffness. Engineer boots typically have an adjustable leather strap across the ankle as well as an adjustable leather strap at the top of the shaft to adjust the fit. Multiple straps at the top of the shaft are also not uncommon. Soles and heels are usually made of hard rubber and may either be relatively flat or may have lugs for increased traction.

During the depression era, Chippewa Shoe Company[1], of Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, developed a pair of boots with stovepipe leg and was fashioned over "English Riding Boot" last. In the 1960s, Sears carried the Sears branded Chippewa Engineers and showed them as worn by land surveyors, a possibility as of how the name came about.[2] Another major manufacturer of Engineer Boots is West Coast Shoe Company based in Portland, Oregon. They began manufacturing the engineer boot in 1939. A large portion of their sales began with the shipbuilders in Portland, Oregon, building ships for World War II.

Terry
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top