G Scale Model Train Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,910 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have  very nice Aristo Mikado which is all black. I'm thinking of painting it to look more like the Mikado pictured--with tuscan red roof on the cab and gray on the smokebox. I'm not concerned with being too prototypical--the aristo is alredy off in significant ways. But I'd like to imitate that color scheme. I don't have an airbrush

So what's the best kind of paint to use? Regular krylon spray enamel comes in a reasonably tuscan red/brown. And they make a reasonable gray. I also have some exterior latex around that's reasonably close to the right colors. Would it be better to use a preval sprayer?

Will exterior latex adhere well to painted plastic? ? Will spray enamel?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,167 Posts
Spray enamels will work fine. I like to use a black high heat BBQ paint for loco bodies. It buffs up to a nice sheen. Latex paint is far too thick and will cover up details. You can find quality hobby acrylics at most local hobby shows if you want a water base paint. The air brush quality acrylics are even better. Kevin Strong just started a series on painting locos in the Feb GR.



-Brian
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
839 Posts
Brian,

Great photo of your painted engine. Very nice.

Best,
TJ
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,960 Posts
I'm a big fan of Krylon's paints, in fact probably 70% of what I run--especially the locos--are painted with it. I'll also refer you to the Garden Railways article (and not just because I wrote it. :)" align="absMiddle" border="0" src="/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/smile.gif" /> ). Part 1 (Feb issue) deals with disassembling and prepping a loco. Part 2, which should be out in a month or so, covers using spray paints and how to use them for maximum results. Part 3, which I'm writing now, will cover detailing and finishing.

Here's the loco that is covered in the article:


Before:
 

Later,

K
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,910 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Well inspired by these posts I just went ahead and did it. Somewhat nervously using krylon spray. I made some mistakes,  but I like the results a lot. It looks better in real life than in this badly lit picture, and if I keep it moving all the time no one will ever see any screw ups. Now to study up on weathering...
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
428 Posts
looks like you used Krylon grey primer and ruddy brown primer.
You might consider overspraying these with flat or semi-flat clear krylon.
If you don't every slight rub mark will show in the primer.
Later
Rick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Whatever you do, be sure and follow what Marty said about the clear coat, after you finish. There is a Krylon Matte that is uv resistant, if you plan to run it outside. I always find it in Hobby Lobby in their art section. I don't know why it isn't with their large section of all their other Krylon paints.

If you don't cover the paint job, it is easy to scuff it and mess up all that work!/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/sad.gif I usually use at least 2 coats.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,620 Posts
The fusion paints that are available in many colors and clear are UV paints made for out doors.  Go on great also.  Later RJD
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,960 Posts
RJD, from what I've heard from many people, the fusion paints seem to be plagued with problems when used on our models. I've heard this often enough to where I've never bothered experimenting with them, so I can't say firsthand. Are you doing anything in particular to get them to work well for you?

Lownote, the suggestion about a clearcoat is a good one. If you're going to be applying decals to your loco, wait until after the decals are applied to apply the clearcoat. This will help them blend into the surface better.

Later,

K
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,976 Posts
I've had problems with the Fusion Paint.  I think the cheaper the spray paint, the better....


 Lownote - now to paint the wheels and running gear!! Don't remove the wheels, but carefully remove the running gear.  Use of O Rings on the drivers is the best idea I've heard.  I made the mistake of removing my wheels, painting them and then trying to get them re-installed.  Diaster.  Instead, keep them where they are and spray paint them flat black. 

Your results could look like this:

Start:

Finish:

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,910 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Well I just went to do a second coat and messed it up, so I had to wait, then sand, then recoat.

Markoles that looks great, though maybe a little fancy for a freight engine?/Providers/HtmlEditorProviders/Fck/FCKeditor/editor/images/smiley/msn/teeth_smile.gif

I'd like to try blacking the siderods and wheels--maybe with that "neolube" stuff
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
227 Posts
I've had a lot of experience with spray paints, but not necessarily on trains. But, the principles are the same.

First, make sure you heat up the spray can(s) prior to spraying, so that you get a consistent flow of paint from the can. Just fill a large pan or pot up with hot TAP water (DO NOT BOIL THE WATER!!!). Place the spray can(s) in the hot tap water for several minutes, then shake them vigorously before spraying. Paint will come out faster & more forcefully than usual this way, so make sure you hold the can farther away from the subject matter than you might normally.

Enamels (the most common type of spray paint) take up to a week or more to completely "gas out" and cure; if you don't recoat within the specified time period (usually the first couple of hours), then you must wait at least 3 days to recoat; otherwise, as the first coat starts to de-gas, the subsequent coat may orange-peel or worse. Lacquers (such as Dupli-Color from Walmart) dry hard and glossy, and there is no wait time between coats; BUT, these are considered "hot" paints and you MUST properly protect the plastic first or run the risk of "crazing" the plastic (or worse!). Tamiya makes an EXCELLENT primer in both white & gray, and I've had excellent results when applying "hot" lacquer sprays over the Tamiya primer. Of course, when using lacquer sprays, the first few coats are always very thin dustings, and allowed to dry, so that the solvents don't eat through (just in case!). Then, I apply heavier coats afterward.

Acrylic enamels are OK; I've had decent results with them.

One product I like to use on the finished product to really bring out a deep, glossy shine is BRILLIANIZE (www.brillianize.com). It is a spray-on plastic polish, and as soon as it is sprayed on you buff it off with a soft cotton cloth. I've found nothing else like it! It's safe to use on any plastic surface, whether painted or not...just don't try to paint over it!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
283 Posts
Two things to remember:
1.  10 feet rule - if it looks good from 10 feet, it's good enough
2.  It's your railroad, do what you want. 

Also, the fusion paint was having problems, don't remember where I read that.  I use rattle paint from Wally's and finish with a satin clear Krylon.  Never had any problems.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,910 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for all the great advice--I messed around some more, painting the cab window frames the same color as the cab roof,  and added a matte fnish clearcoat  and some painting of the cab interior. I added Shorty, a double amputee LGB figure, as an engineer. One of my favorite features of my old-style Pacific was the firebox light. I hot glued a red LED just under the firebox opening and wired it to the cab light to simultae the firebox glow. I could not get a decent picture of the effect though. Now I think I need to paint those wheels, maybe add a superheater tank...

Thanks all!
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
227 Posts
Thank you Richard! I've even found a way to wet-sand paint to a high-gloss finish, but it's a LOT of work...if anyone is interested, drop me a line for a link to an online step-by-step how-to (another one of my many hobbies...I'll NEVER be bored in life!).

Was anyone aware that you can have custom colors mixed and loaded into spray cans? You can do these with oil-based enamels, urethanes, and lacquers...my wife & I had some custom dark burgundy paint mixed for our home's photo frames, and my wife is slowly but surely painting most of our family photo frames all a matching color. It is automotive urethane, and a gallon loaded up 12 spray cans. It sprays beautifully!

What you do is go to an automotive paint supply shop, pick out the color you want, and see if it is available in Pint sizes...if so, that should end up as about 3 spray cans. Prices start at about $40 for a pint of automotive urethane/enamel/lacquer, which can be loaded into 3 spray cans. OR, you can use a Pre-Val sprayer, which attaches a glass bottle to a pressurized can & spray nozzle, and you can load any paint you want into the glass sprayer. Works great for small areas!

Or if you want to live large like me, you can have a gallon of custom paint mixed and loaded into about 12 spray cans (price about $120-$150, depending upon type of paint). Just make sure you use an appropriate primer!!!
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top