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I'm about to attempt my very first scratch building, and after reading the posts about Easyboard, I decided to give it a try; it was available for the first time at my local Home Depot. It's 1/2 inch thick, and waterproof. I'. in a quandry however (help, help, I've fallen into a quandry and I can't get out) about the wall treatment. I was thinking that board and batten might look nice (dimensions are 27" long, 15" high, and 14" deep), but what to use and how to attach it? Should I just cut some thin strips of cedar or redwood and glue them on? Or purchase them ready-made? What are good glues for that? Or, is plastic siding better and more durable. I live In Salinas, California so snow is not a problem, and we only average about 14 inches of rain a year. Or, is there some other material, or treatment, that would look authentic and weather well?

I know these are probably basic questions for many of you, but the more I get into this hobby, it seems that the more things I don't know.


Thanks
RB Whale
 

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First off, depending on the texture of the Easyboard, you don't need to glue on the boards. only the narrower battens. The Easyboard surface can represent the boards beneath. Wood will swell and contract a bit with heat and cold as most materials will do. With separate boards beneath the battens you get movement on two levels instead of one which greatly increases the chance of something coming loose.

For battens you can either cut your own stripwood preferably from cedar or redwood whichever is available or more economical. But since the background surface won't be wood there's really no need for the battens to be. Evergreen provides styrene strips in various sizes that make very nice battens. The styrene will hold up fine as long as it's painted to protect it from UV rays. I would draw lines on the walls to guide the batten placement and glue them on. I've had great luck with Welder which is a contact cement that is available at Walmart. After the glue dries prime the entire surface with a good spray primer such as Bondo grey, red or black before painting the desired color.

Salinas weather I believe is similar to that of Watsonville which is relatively coolish except for a few hot days in summer? So the styrene if painted should hold up well. moisture shouldn't be an issue there as Welder cement has held up very well here in moist Oregon.


This is the roof of a depot I recently built. The roof itself is Acrlic (plexiglass) and the ribs are Evergreen's styrene strip. The strips were attached with Welder contact cement then the whole thing was primed with Bondo primer, and texture painted. You can see what great battens those strips would make. Of course you might want larger strips for your battens.
 
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