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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have seen a few raised tracks banked on the corners and I thought to myself, since the maximum diameter I can use it 13' in my layout then maybe super elevating the curves slightly would help my situation and let it behave like a larger diameter track.

The only one I can find is yves's track. http://www.southernsteamtrains.com/misc/Gare%20du%20Nord%20-%20Trinidad-2.htm (I know he had an engineering firm build the concrete roadbed for him)


Does anyone have an examples of super elevating the curves of raised track using wood?

Might be a good thing to think about for those of us that don't have a lot of land for a big track.

Some stuff I have found http://www.trackplanning.com/superelevation.htm



Track plan:
http://www.diablosport.com/images/misc/afinegantrack.jpg
 

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I started building my raised layout almost before I started to acquire alcohol fired 1/32 scale live steam engines that will move significantly faster then my narrow scale engines. So even though my new layout is pretty level, I am already thinking about ways to go back and bank the track and or elevate the outside of my layout, so the track ends up being bank. I don't care so much about the scale look compared to real railroad tracks I just want to run the engines faster.

I'll let you know if I come up with a way to do so, as I am trying to make this adjustment as easy and cheap as possible.
 

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I use inexpensive cedar shims from a building supply to level my track in a couple of bad places on my layout and don't see why you couldn't use them to apply super elevation to your curves. The slopes of the shims are very gentle and should work. Be careful running expensive locomotives at Lionel speeds so you don't sail one off your layout.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Of course there is a limit to the speed you would want to run, there is a good clip that most of us run our locomotives at diamondhead on the green track (the asters), just wonder if a slight super elevation on the curve can make the track a bit safer at diamondhead green track speeds (the asters) on a 13' diameter curve or is the 13' diameter curve safe enough flat (I cant fit anything wider, grr)?

The more I think about it, the more I feel I am over engineering my track lol. Just want the best possible setup in my 52' x 18' backyard and still have access to all areas of it.
 

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No doubt a structural engineer was involved in the design of his pavillion, but the concrete track bed system Yves used is a commercial product sold out of France and used to be advertised in the G1MRA Journal. It's always looked to me to be a marvelous system, and costly, but no doubt more costly to ship than to buy.
 

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Some time back a G1MRA member wrote a Super Elev. tech analysis for the G1MRA Journal&Newsletter. Conclusions; 1. The effects do not scale; 2. SE of no benefit in our scale; 3. Can cause excessive wear to wheels/rail. I believe the scale calculation resulted in a 1-3 degree elevation.

The other curve mitigation method (other than larger radius curves) is curve easement. Easement seems to me the better solution than SE. Easement may reduce the curve radius a little, if your maximum space is limited, but the benefit to running would be worth it.
 

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I agree with Chris Scott's last statement. I saw the G1MRA article.

We have a 12 foot radius track in the Seattle Group that we run mainline trains on (Daylight, Aster etc)
I have playe around with super elevation and found that the G1MRA article was basically correct. So just the smallest of a shim was all that was helpful
Curve easement is important

jim o
 

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Overall super elevation does not do much for one in G scale. It's more for effect than operation. As far as rail wear your dreaming if you think its going to happen with super elevation. You would have to run your LS engine so fast as to hug the high side of the curve to even think about cure wear. Most LS folks run slow and your loco will be hugging the low side of the curve so contact with the high side of the curve is minimal unless your running very tight curves. I do not see you running your LS locos at those types of speeds that would require super elevation and if you did your a slot car driver. Later RJD
 

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I still have some old Aster track, with the metal ties. I think they had about 3 mm of super elevation. I find it easier to put the super elevation in the decking while building, but only put in about 1/2" across 2 ft., this is with 19+ ft min radius.
 
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