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Discussion Starter #1
I went to replace the blade on my band saw the other day, as the old one was getting to the point where butter was becoming a formidable opponent. No problem; I've done this plenty of times in the past. Take the old one off, put the new one back on. Adjust tension, and you're off and running, right?

Obviously not, or I wouldn't be posting.

I can't keep the new blade on the wheels. It keeps wanting to slip off the front. I moved the wheels as far forward on the bearings as I could, thinking that would remedy the problem. No such luck. It still insists on falling off the front.

So, I figured I'd just re-install the old blade and muddle through.

Nope. It seems to have learned the undesirable behavior from the new blade.

Any thoughts? I can use my mini table saw in the short term for straight cuts, but at some point in the near future, I'm gonna want to do some fancy stuff again, and would really like to have the saw working properly.

Later,

K
 

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I use a metal cutting band saw so it may not apply, but when my blade comes off, it’s usually due to not enough tension on the blade.
Joel
 

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According to this web site...

Tracking the Blade.

When your saw is tracking correctly, the blade runs on the middle of the wheels. Adjust the tracking by tilting the top wheel in relation to the bottom wheels. A knob behind the upper wheel housing controls this adjustment. Spin the saw by hand and adjust the tracking control until the blade is running in the middle of the wheel. Lock the control in this position. Replace the cover and plug in the saw. Check the tracking by bumping the switch on an off to check the tracking. The blade should maintain its position. Repeat this several times before running the saw at full speed.
 

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A couple of questions. How old is the saw and have you ever replaced the tensioning spring for the blade tension. It sure sounds like the spring has lost its tension and you just can't get enough tension on the blade. What brand and size saw is it?
 

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Kevin

Another thing to check are the rubber tires on the wheels, since the impression that I have is that you've been using the same blade for quite some time. If the tires are hardened from age that can also cause you tracking problems.
 

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A Steamed Elder
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Tracking and hardness of old band-saw wheels are usually the culprits for this problem. Loose tension will cause blades to come out of the guides. Too tight will usually cause blades to break.
 

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Wel,l you guys are correct about the tires and the Wheel alighnment but, blade tension to much (I haven't experienced) or to little is also a major culprit. "The Band Saw Handbook" by Mark Dunginske (Amazon has new and used) list both and in a lot of cases the blade has insufficient tension because the tensioning spring has lost its tension but the saw's tension gauge is still showing the proper tension
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, I finally had the opportunity to return to the sadly-neglected workshop tonight (to clean in preparation of having the basement finished, not to actually do any modeling), and in the process decided to have one more go at getting the band saw to go. After much fiddling and fussing, I finally got it back in working order. The posts that hold the wheels were just a bit loose, so they wanted to bend inward under tension. This naturally pushes the blade outward. Once they were tightened within an inch of their lives and I fiddled with the blade tension, it settled down and now runs as true as it always has.

Now, all I need is time to get working on the next project...

Later,

K
 
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