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After extensive consultation with various authorities, I've decided to repaint an Aristo Pacific in B&O blue to match a set of heavyweight cars. I'm going with Badger Model flex Royal Blue, and I'll be spraying it on with a Preval sprayer

So do I need a primer first? Badger's promotional claim is no, and I'd rather not prime it if I don't have to. Does anyone have any experience with this brand?

thanks
 

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My experience with Badger paints is that you DO NOT need to prime. With only a finish coat, detail shows much better. The main trick is to be certain that your model is absolutely clean before you paint. A single finger print can show like a beacon. I use a good grease-cutting dishwashing detergent.

Llyn
 

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I also find Badger paints don't need or benefit from a primer. And just as Llyn mentioned, the surface must be prepped properly. Dish detergent is great at getting oil off the surface, but be sure to rinse a lot with hot water as the detergent can leave a film that will act as a separating agent. I use PollyS Plastic Prep when I don't use a primer.
Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you all--I just tried it ith a preval sprayer, total disaster. The Preval sprayed too heavy, the paint ran off, then there was too little in the preval bottle to spray. Yikes! I was just about to break out the Krylon when I decided to brush the badger on by hand. Tedious, and not as professional looking--not even close--but it will pass the 10 foot test I think


If anyone is looking for B&O Royal Blue Badger's Royal Blue is excellent--a really nice color and exactly what I see when I look at pictures of the B&O presidents in blue
 

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Eeek! Brush painting with Badger /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/crazy.gif

That's tough. Badger paint is pre-thinned for airbrushing. Makes it very difficult to brush paint. Tends to be runny.

I personally hate Badger paint, as it seems to dry too quickly (not so good for large G scale rolling stock) and is a pain to clean up. But it does come in some nice railroad specific colors. Had to use it for some D&RGW orange (16-61) on a speeder repaint...there's still some of that blasted orange in my airbrush /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/pinch.gif
 

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I recently bought some Badger paints for a project, after my usual trick of thinning Folk-Art acrylics left me with rather unfortunate results. Besides the color on the paint chip being worlds apart from what came out of the bottle (grumble, snort!!), I found them to be very easy to use both through the airbrush and by brush. In fact, I had brush-painted an entire side of a car with the Badger paints with very good results when I decided that it was far more tedious than using the airbrush. Alas, after dealing with clogged tips through that process, I'm not sure my reasoning was quite sound. Of course, had I actually thoroughly cleaned my airbrush after the Folk-Art fiasco, I probably would not have had near as much trouble. But when you use a tool once every three or four years, you're allowed something of a learning curve each time, right?

Later,

K
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It came out only sort of Ok, I think. I worked the shell over with some rubbing compound which gave it a nice patina and made the uneve-ness look more like weathering. I'd like to get this look, where some areas are glossy and some are rougher--like a working engine that gets cleaned a lot, which I assume the blue prez series would have been
 

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