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Here is a project that I completed several years back and have one more to do for a customer that I will log its progress once started. It is a fun engine to work with (at least all Shay's are fun if you like em.)
The engine was rebuilt from the frame up and I can post progress steps if anyone is interested. The original shay was converted to a 2 foot gauge loco (scale 1:13.7 or 7/8"=1'-0").
cheers Ferd






Link to the full set of pics on flickr. :


http://www.flickr.com/photos/ferds-pics/sets/72157609965728670/




Cheers Ferd
 

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Ferd,

Really nice. I like the wood roof and antlers. Progress pics would be great as is always said PICS PICS PICS. Helps with the before after aspect.

Dave
 

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I LOVE the distressed wood look. Is it cedar? Like the corroded copper suction hose as well.

If decide you want to redo the airbrake and injector plumbing in a more prototypical manner, and make it as good as the rest of the model, look up that section on Fletch's mogul masterclass
 

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Hi  - thanks 
The decking and buffer beams are cedar, the wood on the roof is lemon wood. The wood was aged with steel wool dipped in vinegar and left to dry. It will turn cedar almost black. Other woods like the lemon  wood and poplar will turn a more grey color. Any small bits of the steel wool that break off if left on the wood to dry create dark spots. It is a quick and fun way to weather wood. 
Will post pics of the conversion - the whole conversion was done using only hand tools and a power drill. That was before I had a complete machine shop in my workshop. 
cheers
 

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Hey Ferd,


Nice to see you over here.  Awesome job on the Shay.


Regards, 
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The first photo is the builders pic that I used as reference, although I did modify the roof etc.... as most of my railroads seem to develop a more tropical theme.
 
I had decided to rebuild the shay from the frame up, and to my surprise the frame was metal. (the shay used was one of the first run shays.) the only drawback was the wheel bolsters were not fixed to the frame rather held in place by the deck which I did not want to use. This was solved by drilling a tapping a few small bolts. This made the frame extremely rigid which turned out to be a real blessing as the finished engine weighed close to 12 pounds. (see photo 2)


One of the first tasks I took on after the frame was bolted together was extending the stack to match the builder photo in height. Since I only had a hand drill and drill press as power tools I went about it as simple as possible. The original stack was cut and and small brass tube inserted between the two cut pieces. The tube was then covered with epoxy putty. Once cured the stack was sanded to final shape using the drill as a sort of lathe and sandpaper.  Today I have a full machine shop in my office and go about everything in a far more complex manner. Not sure if that is progression. :cool:


more to come... 
 

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The Boiler: I used a lot of the original boiler with modifications to the dome and cab controls. The first photo shows the boiler with modified dome before any painting. The second photo has the base paint added. The entire boiler assembly was painted with the Rustoleum antique rust 2 part kit. There is a copper - rust base paint then a second coat of an antiquing rust looking solution (hard to explain) most craft stores sell it. Once dry I airbrushed the boiler with aged black and then the top with oily black leaving the rust base exposed underneath the boiler. Once dry I coated the works with a matt lacquer to help bullet proof the paint. The last photo shows the added cedar decking. I used straight cedar planks that were rubbed down with steel wool dipped in vinegar and let to dry. This ages the wood as though it had been left outside for many years. 
more to come....
 

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The top photo shows a small piece of cedar half unfinished the other has been rubbed with steel wool dipped in vinegar and let dry.  The bottom two pics show the trucks repainted and weathered. The same rust effect paint that was used on the boiler was used on the trucks and then a black wash and dry brushing was applied. The trucks will be hooked up to  the onboard RC and Battery set up.
 

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To continue the top photo now shows the boiler with the added decking in place. I used marine epoxy to glue the cedar to the frame. Doubt they will ever come loose. The bottom two photos show the trucks assembled back onto the frame and boiler.  The water syphon was made using a hockey skate lace with the original bachmann end piece. The lace was dipped in diluted acrylic paint then weathered with black wash and dry brushing. It was glued in place to give the desired draping effect. The tool box is made of cedar with functional hinges. Will show detail pics of the tool box in the next post. Will also cover the cylinder modifications as the cylinder head was increased in size to match the prototype photo. more to come...
 

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Here is a simple post of the frame and boiler assembly painted with the toolbox shown open and closed. The wood is cedar and the hinges were plastic model RC aircraft hinges. 
 

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The front and rear buffer beams were reinforced with a brass plate. This allows for a direct bolt onto the frames and provides a large surface area to attach the wood beams to along with coupler pockets etc.. See first photo for detail. The other two photos show the cylinder extension, which was done using parts found around the workshop. more to follow......
 

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Here is a quick jump to the figures. The engineer is a Pete figure that is no longer in production although may surface again soon. The other figure in the two man crew (the fireman) is one I made out of epoxy putty. I have tried a lot of different mediums and A+B putty is still my favorite. The first pic shows the base I use for my figures the newer figures have changed slightly and I may put up a short step by step of how I build up my figures from scratch in 7/8ths. The photo shows an early attempt at casting armatures in white metal. It worked well for this figure and I have since switched to resin torso parts and use plumbers solder for the armatures.   The second two show Abner the engineer. This is a resin figure that Pete at Daisy Beach used to sell. One of the truly appealing features I still like the most in 7/8ths scale is the size of the figures. It is also one of the downsides if you are not comfortable making your own, although if I am able to do it anyone else on this forum surely can. 
 

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This set of pics shows the figures in place on the loco. The fireman who is relaxing with a coffee is sitting on a temporary barrel to get the right sitting height. The cab is made out of sheet brass and most of the details ie. spanner, coffee pot etc.. are from a dollhouse shop (1/12) scale, close enough to 7/8ths for small detail items. To get the peeling paint effect I used the old trick of applying rubber cement to the bottom coat before adding the top color. Then removing the rubber cement after the paint is dry with an eraser. The water hose in the cab is painted plumbers solder. It bends well and is easy to get. 
 

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The tender is also made from brass and is a basic assembly. The rivets were done in a drill press using a centre punch. Once I was happy with it the whole unit is pickled in vinegar (not a fun of sulphuric acid) and primed and painted. The tender holds a 12v gel cell battery. All the RC gear were placed in the boiler with access from the front smokebox door. The lid in the last photo is designed to drop into the tender with a very close fit allowing for quick access to the batteries. All the wood was glued to the lid so it hides the fact that it lifts up. 
 

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The top photo shows the battery used and a full charge would be good for days of running. This engine with all the added weight pulled like a horse. The last two pics show the tender with the lid removed and in place. The wood on top of the lid was placed so that when the lid was in place it matched the wood on the locomotive. 
 

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The roof was the next step and open planks with leather or canvas covering felt right for the locomotive. Brass tubing round and rectangular is used as a substructure to support the wood planks. The first photo shows the overhead view before the roof is added. The other two images show the roof supports. 
 

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