G Scale Model Train Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
LGB Indoor Elevated Track
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry if this has been asked before, but I could not find an answer.

I just recently purchased a Bachmann 4-6-0 second gen (drivers turn) at a good price that runs but is a little on the loud/noisy side. I thought I might put in a new chassis and went to Bachmann's parts website. I will probably pop for the anniversary chassis, which are all listed as "G 4-6-0". However, when looking at the standard 4-6-0 section I see this:
Purple Violet Font Rectangle Magenta


As far as Bachmann goes, is there a difference between "Large" and "G"? Is G for narrow gauge and Large for standard gauge, or is there no difference at all?

On a side note... A section of the grab bar that runs along the boiler on one side is missing. Is there a source for? those?
 

·
Super Modulator
Joined
·
22,232 Posts
just poor work on consistency on their site... Large = G on their site.

You do know the scales of various large/g varies though, some is 1:22.5, some 1:20.3, and I think there is some stuff closer to 1:24... but that is another topic.

If the bachmann forum was up, which of these chassis would be the best would be answered by "Loco" Bill Canolos (I probably mispelled his last name).

Normally the differences are the valve gear type, and paint highlighting...

get the exploded / parts diagrams from their site, that part is up and running.

Greg
 

·
Registered
LGB Indoor Elevated Track
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Greg, Good to know that it is just inconsistency.

Yes, I am painfully aware (lots of research) of the various locomotive scales within G scale. My understanding is that G scale actually refers to the gauge of the track, in this case 45mm. It is also my understanding that LGB (credited for developing the G scale) came up with 1:22.5, as that was the best scale (in their opinion) for narrow gauge railway locomotives and rolling stock. Standard gauge locomotives and rolling stock needed to be designed at a different scale in order for the proportions to look right with G gauge track. Also some manufacturers had other reason for using a different scale. Would have made more sense to call it G gauge instead of G scale to keep the confusion down, or in the case of this forum Large Scale. :)

Too bad the Bachmann forum has been down for so long. I have been hoping it comes back up as I have had several internet searches take me there. It looks like it was a great resource for everything Bachmann, although your site has some really good info which helped me identify which version chassis I have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
I believe g scale track is actually just a narrow gauge version of 1 gauge track. That is where o or 0 gauge gets its name. LGB didn’t come up with g gauge (1 gauge). I think this all started about a 120 or so years ago as a way to standardize early scales and gauges. I believe it goes all the way up to gauge 3. Gauge one and O gauge were the most popular though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I have done the operation you are thinking about. I upgraded an ET&WNC starter set locomotive with the annivery edition chassis. The metal running gear is a huge improvement over the simplistic plastic one on the starter set. Of course, the prototype for me is an early 20th century locomotive with the Walschaerts valve gear, if your loco is a mid-century one with the simpler piston rods, it won’t be as impressive an upgrade, but likely still worth it since your engine has noise (have you tried checking the grease on the gears?) It’s not that difficult to do this swap either, just get the exploded diagram as Greg said.

I got mine on sale for seemingly cheaper than what they are charging now, but they seemed to have sold out of a lot of the stock of the older locomotives. I guess that they put stuff on sale when they are closing it out. For the grab bar, there are a number of those they are selling, just page through the 4-6-0 anniversary parts.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,818 Posts
LGB (credited for developing the G scale) came up with 1:22.5, as that was the best scale (in their opinion) for narrow gauge railway locomotives
It wasn't their 'opinion' particularly. In Germany, full-size narrow gauge trains (e.g. the current tourist trains) are meter/metre gauge, which is 39+ inches gauge. If you do the math, you will find that 1:22.5 is the correct scale for meter gauge trains on 45mm track.
this all started about a 120 or so years ago as a way to standardize early scales and gauges.
Indeed it did, with Gauges 1, 2 and 3, all of which have implied scales related to the standard gauge models. Gauge 2 died as it is too similar to Gauge 3, but Gauge 1 is very popular here and in Europe and uses 1:32 scale. Gauge 3 is popular in the UK, as it is 1:22.5 scale on 64mm track. Kingscale started making British prototype models in live steam to that scale, and very impressive they are.
Another piece of trivia. As Gauge 2 had died, the Germans renamed Gauge 3 [just to confuse things] as "Spur II", i.e. gauge roman 2. So Spur II is our Gauge 3 and 1:22.5.
Using the conventional way to denominate narrow gauge, LGB calls their trains "IInm" or just "IIm". It's written on their boxes, sometimes.

I could go on, but there are many learned descriptions of all the permutations online. . .
 

·
Registered
LGB Indoor Elevated Track
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Gentlemen, thank you for the education. I have only been back at this for three weeks now and have been doing a tremendous amount of research to refresh my memory. On hindsight, the article I was referencing may have said "popularized G scale", not developed, regarding LGB's role, but alas I can't find that article. I find as I get older, it gets harder for me to keep it all straight. So, I stand corrected, even though I am sitting here as I write this. ;)

Following astack's suggestion, I removed the bottom and checked the gears. I was surprised at how clean and good of a shape they are in. I made sure the grease was distributed evenly, then went about lubricating the axels (and other moving parts), and took some 1000 grit sandpaper to clean some slight corrosion off of the wheels. She actually is quite a bit less noisy now, probably just the right amount of noise for a 2nd gen Big Hauler.

Train Wheel Vehicle Rolling stock Track


I put a battery in, and the sound works, although compared to the LGB Mogul with digital sound, it' barely passible as a steam locomotive chuff. The front and rear lights don't work, and I don't think the smoke generator works (and yes switch is on). So, this still may be a good candidate for a customization project.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
I would put this Anniversary chassis under it:
Thiis is the best match for the Santa Fe #49,Santa Fe #51,SPC# 21 and #22 as well.
I did with Santa Fe #49 using an Anniversary chassis chassis that I rebuilt using parts from the Bachmann Parts Store and my spare parts bins.
Video here:
It's a fairly simple operation.
You will have to solder the 2 wires to the switch for the smoke and front headlight.
But it's pretty straight forward once you get into it.
Good luck if you decide to accept this mission!
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top