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You say the gear driven axle is locked up. Can you make the third axle move at all by applying current to the pickups or wheels? Something as simple as taking a 9v battery and some wires to the power pickups or the driver wheels should provide enough current to an engine that's upside down and disassembled to make the motor turn the gear driven axle around.

I don't know if there's anything here that might help you but Schreyer's website has helped solved many of my train problems.

http://www.girr.org/girr/tips/tips1/big_hauler_tips.html#totaled

Good luck!

Scott
 

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The rods should not be in line with each other for balance. Think of a clock face. If one side is at 6 o'clock the other side should most likely be at 3 o'clock or 9 o'clock. My Big Haulers are both that way and my Connie was also. I think [just my theory] if they lined up both at the same place or even completely opposite each other it would make the engine kind of hop, like a car tire out of balance. I've not had to take the drivers off my Haulers but when I took them off to fix the drive gear on my Connie I found that they are "keyed" with a slot/tab so you can't put the driver on the axle any other way.
I have to ask if you've tried to flip the other two axles over and insert the other axles in different orientation. To me it seems they should have one way where each axle has the rods where they are supposed to be in correlation to the driven 3rd axle or have you tried this already and I'm misunderstanding what you're saying?

Scott
 

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Makes much more sense than my theory Pete. I love looking at and running steam locomotive models and have read a fair bit about them but...they still are mystifyingly complex almost arcane pieces of machinery. I hadn't really thought about it much but was thinking they were mounted 90 degrees to each other [or is that what they mean by quartered?] more for a balance reason but obviously mounted any other way and about all your drive rods would do is make one big push...and get hung up there.
Diesels are a bit easier for me to fathom than steam engines. Basically just diesel powered generator & electric motors as opposed to complicated valve gearing, water and coal systems, miles of boiler tubing, pressure relief valve, superheaters, drive rods and pistons, etc., etc.. . Simple...and much more boring to look at.
 

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I was just guessing that you might have inadvertently flipped one of the axles over from its original position which would've thrown everything all out of whack. Hope that solved it for you and that your Annie will be running like new again.

From my limited experience I think it's a good model locomotive and has been one of the least 'fiddly' engines I own, just put it on the track, throw the power to it, and it goes. I hope it serves you well.

S
 
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