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Does anyone have recommendations on how to lay up decking without getting glue everywhere. I have 35 pieces of scale 1:20.3 1x7 decking to assemble.

Thanks

Dave
 

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Dave,
Sorry to sound dumb, but decking on what?
Flat car, station platform, ?
And is this scale wood that you are gluing?
Merry Christmas,
David Leech, Delta, Canada
 

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I have not done any on a boat but have done it several ways on coaches and loco cabs. 1. Spray the floor and the under side of the planking with contact cement. When dry apply the planking to the floor. 2. Use a strong double side tape such as carpet tape. 3. Gel type supper glue.
 

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Dave;

Not sure about the nature of your project, so I am just offering this as a possible alternative. When I am adding the deck to something like a flatcar with wood frame members, I simply spike the decking down to the frame. HO or O scale track spikes have worked very well for me. I do use a pin vise to drill a short pilot hole for each spike. My decking of choice is wooden coffee stir sticks. I have to reject several for every straight piece, but they are so inexpensive per piece that they are still cost effective. the rejects can stir coffee or get used as "scenery" for a scrap wood pile. There are two photo examples of spiked decking below.




Regards,
David Meashey
 

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Dave, deck on that flat car is beautiful, nice work. If the area is longer you may want to look into the Butt system where the plank lengths are staggered. LiG
 

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Thanks for all the suggestions. For clarification, the decking is the flooring for a 26' boxcar, frame is wooden. The planking needs to be square and aligned along the outside edge of the side sills. The deck is then to be notched for vert/diagonal bracing and then sheeted on the outside and inside.

Dave
 

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1. Pick your squarest end and corners, make that the start point. You may want to butt that against a timber block to keep the planks inline.

2. Use a good carpenters glue (Aquadhere, Titebond, Siltek) or Quikgrip (Selleys, construction adhesive) and smear a thin cover over the beams and joists then apply the planking.

3. The planking needs to be butt jointed (side edge to side edge) also glued along the edge, hard edged means that it is pushed very firmly together with no gaps.

4. Allow overhang of the sides lengthways, then trim to fit after and notch for your sides.

Its important that the timber is straight and not curved lengthways, a slight bend is tolerable if the timber is sandwiched and pushed into straight by other straighter planks.

Planks that are cupping - that is a C shaped bend. Are best used with the bend pointing up and the edges on the beams - once weighted or clamped firmly will flex enough to straighten and fix with nails.

Using a weight to hold the planks in position while curing, drill and add pins after. weather as needed.


Would like to see pics of your work once you're done.
 

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Scott

Thanks for the suggestions, will post some pics when I get started. Below is a pic of a previous project, the floor was scribed ply

Dave
 

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