G Scale Model Train Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,910 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been trying to make a big hauler into a 1:29 0-6-0. I have no experience and no real idea what I'm doing. So here's what I settled on as a prototype, an early PRR B6



and using parts from a big hauler, a derelict aristo Pacific, and what I think were drive rods from an lgb mogul, I've gotten this far:




I'm not aiming for exact modeling--I couldn't pull it off if I wanted to. I'm aiming for a robust looking approximation. I can see I need to lower the cylinders, and I want to bring the cab forward maybe half an inch, and make some kind of superstructure for the cab to rest on. But I'm fairly pleased so far
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Not bad at all.

I'm not sure how much you wish to play with the prototype, but if I may offer one suggestion, if you wish to approximate the prototype a bit closer: Channel the cab in height through the window area. It will allow a straight footplate to fit directly up against the bottom edge of the cab and clear the top of the cylinder as well, much like the B6. It'll also close up the side windows a bit, for that matter.

-Kurt
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,910 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you kindly, I appreciate the suggestions. I'm not sure what you mean, though, by "Channel the cab in height through the window area." I though about trying to cut a big hauler cab down, but the aristo cab seemed like a better bet. Now I can see the window will be too big....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
The same as chopping the roof on a car, essentially. In this case, slice the cab longitudinally, but not at the bottom or top - make the cut at the window area, and then take a second slice out. Sand as necessary to even out the cut, and glue the two halves back together.

Presto - a cab with a lower profile, and smaller windows to boot.

-Kurt
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,297 Posts
Cool keep it up, it looks great so far. i think the cab lookd fine, but then I'm pretty easy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,186 Posts
I can see I need to lower the cylinders


FYI - the actual steam cylinders should be centered vertically on the axles. In other words, the piston rod points at the center of the wheel driven by the connecting rod. Makes sense if you think about it: the rod driving the wheels is pushed/pulled by the cylinder piston, and its other end is oscillating up and down as the wheel rotates. So you would want to oscillation to be symmetrical.

You can see on your protoype photo that the cylinder's piston rod is exactly over the center of the front driving wheel.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
759 Posts
That's looking great! Definietly one to watch the progress on.

If I may make a suggestion.. The silver riveted area should not extend forward of the firebox. You may want to consider covering, smoothing, or removing the portion above and ahead of the rear driver. Even better, cut it off and move it back under the cab a bit, since the firebox extends into the cab.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
237 Posts
Tweak it abit with the above suggestions and you will have a very credible engine. The overall size and proportions look very good. Keep us posted.

Terl
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,910 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I've made some progress. I lowered the cab, make a riveted jacket for the smokebox, and figured out how to attach various bits. Here's the update:




and the prototype, reversed:




I started out wanting to make something kind of casual and whimsical, and then got bitten by the accuracy bug. I think this is about as accurate as I can make it, given that I have no modeling "skills" and have just been blundering my way through it like a blind man. I need to finish the undercab area, and add a pilot, figure secure attachments for it all, and then start paint prep. I'm going to try to build something like the firebox under footboards too


Also I started to think that if I was investing all this time, I wanted something that ran better than an old Bg Hauler. So I found a lightly used Annie on ebay for a good price and that's now the drive/chassis
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
759 Posts
Wow! That's quite an improvement. I especially like the cab. It looks as thought it was always ment to be that size.

As far as not having any skill, there's only one way to get some - keep building! I'd never done anyhting like this when I started my first scratchbuilding project, but I decided to jump right in and see what happens. I've made most of the parts at least twice now. Heck, I've probably got enough scrap parts to make a wierd, deformed sister engine by now. But that's how I learned how to make something that satisfies my toughest critic - me!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,510 Posts
Don't get yerself confused by reversing the photo... the air compressor belongs on the other side. Nice looking prototype and good work on the model!
 
G

·
Posted By lownote on 10/10/2008 10:50 AM
Thanks kurt, that makes perfect sense.

Vic it was your 0-6-0 that inspired me-so it's your fault!



Vic's Fault!!!!
Yeah buddy!!!!!

Toad
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,910 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Paint is your friend!


Yesterday I managed to get some paint on it. It wasn't all screwed together when I took this-that cap under the cab will disappear







I need to make a pilot, and then start adding the details--handrails, piping, sandlines, whistle etc. I think it looks a little like a B6
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,007 Posts
For not knowing what you're doing, you're doing pretty good. Did you read the old Article by David Fletch? It has some geat pointers in it. It's like a bible to me, when I am working on locos.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top