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Hello all,

I am considering getting myself some sort of disk sander or belt sander, to speed up construction of my various projects. I work most of the time with either brass or styrene, and would like something to speed up the 'squaring up' of ends, angles etc., so I was thinking maybe one of those little bench sanders with the sanding disk on the end of the motor? Has anyone got one or can make any suggestions?

Thanks,
Keith
 

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Thanks Dwight!

It looks like Proxxon makes a really nice one (TG250e), and a couple of others...I'll keep digging.
 

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For brass I'd use a benchtop grinder. They are available quite cheap with two wheels for two different abrasive wheels and don't take up much space. Uneven sharp brass edges will make short work of sandpaper.

For plastic and wood I use a 12" disc sander mostly. The smaller ones work fine for stripwood and small objects but are not as good for some of the larger components we often have to smooth in largescale.
 

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I got the Ryobi 4" belt, 6" disc combo sander from Home Depot. It works great on brass. The belt travels slow compared to the disc, so it works brass very well. The disc has considerable speed. I tend to sand brass closer to the center of the disc where the surface speed is slower..

Sure beats a file.

Bob
 

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I prefer a belt sander because it goes in the same direction no matter where you move the piece along the table. I have a hand held that I secure to a jig. I also have a handheld disc sander, but rarely use it.
 

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Posted By Richard Smith on 07/30/2008 3:25 PM
For brass I'd use a benchtop grinder. They are available quite cheap with two wheels for two different abrasive wheels and don't take up much space. Uneven sharp brass edges will make short work of sandpaper.
For plastic and wood I use a 12" disc sander mostly. The smaller ones work fine for stripwood and small objects but are not as good for some of the larger components we often have to smooth in largescale.




Richard:

Metal-grinding paper disks are quite common and are very good for grinding brass, which is relatively soft and tends to clog a standard vitreous grinder wheel. I have a 12" disk sander which I've fashioned a second faceplate for. One has a metal-grinding pad on it, the other a wood-only pad.

I'm weary of switching disks, it's not simple, so I'm making a second disk grinder from a cheap Asian wood lathe headstock. My particular one has a 3-sheave pulley for speed regulation, some have an electric speed control.

You're right on about sharp brass making hash of a wood-sanding wheel.

Also, to make your belts and discs stay clog-free longer, when you first put 'em on, rub a stick of beeswax across them, or the standard dressing gunk available at metal-tooling supply houses.

Les W.
 
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