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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've always used craft type acrylics, but really don't care for the consistency. Seeing how I am somewhat of a tightwad - as much as I can be in this hobby
, I was hoping those with experience could tell me whether it is worth the expense changing to high quality paints.

Thanks,
Matt
 

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Not sure what you consider high quality paints. If you mean "Artist's Acrylics" like Liquitex, you may be disappointed. Artist acrylics are formulated to have a texture and thickness similar to oil paints, while many of them do not contain the same level of pigment. They are designed to be "painting" paints. What this means is that you will often (if not always) have to thin the acrylic down to work it thinly enough on small surfaces, but it may not cover as well.
If you refer to model acrylics as being high quality paint, I suspect you may prefer them to artist acrylics. But be aware that most brands of model acrylics are formulated differently. Model acrylics tend to cover better than craft acrylics and some, like Polly Scale paints have a very high level of high quality pigment.
I use all types of acrylic paints, even including acrylic house paint. Each has its advantages. Personally, for all around versatility I prefer craft acrylics. They thin out well for washes and spraying and work very well for drybrushing as well.
I'd suggest getting a bottle of the same color in each type of acrylic and doing your own comparison test to see which is the most comfortable for the way you work.
The other thing to keep in mind is that craft acrylics vary in quality as much as any other paint and a high quality craft paint is a world of difference from a low quality one.
Chris
 

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How well do the Apple Barrel flat acyrlics hold up outdoors? So far those are the only craft acyrlics I've seen that have a really flat finish, but I'm worried they may fade or discolor in sunlight.

The Tamiya Color modeling acrylics have an even flatter finish, and go on much more smoothly. Any experience with those outdoors?
 

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Apple Barrel acrylics (and most craft acrylics) are pretty stable and hold up well outdoors. Some pigments are more UV sensitive than others, so it will vary a bit between colors.
Tamiya are not designed for outdoor use specifically. Tamiya changed their formulation some years ago and I believe the paints do hold up better outdoors than they used to. I've never had any problems with Tamiya outdoors, but I don't think I've left anything painted with them outside for a full year. Great paints to work with!
Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, Chris. I was hoping you would chime in.

I hadn't thought of comparing brands that way. Definitely worth the effort.




Take care,
Matt
 

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Posted By Matt Vogt on 11/09/2008 8:34 PM
I've always used craft type acrylics, but really don't care for the consistency. Seeing how I am somewhat of a tightwad - as much as I can be in this hobby
, I was hoping those with experience could tell me whether it is worth the expense changing to high quality paints.

Thanks,
Matt






Matt,

You might want to give Badger Modelflex paints a try. They're made for airbrushing but work nicely for brush work too. They're very thin and cover well.


-Brian
 
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