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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

here another nice project that will be in my warehouse about end of March 2015. It is already produced and will be shipped by sea freight.



I never talked much about this loco because I liked to tell my customers I have a new loco and it is in stock. Now it is only a few weeks until I get it. I am as a little child before christmas so I need to see what my friends had done in China so I ask them to express mail me the first production sample. It receives mid of January and ...

... perfect!!! Here my thanks to all at the factory in China who had worked on this project.

Tag Gorton from Gardenrail UK got the IK for review which will come in the next issue of his magazine. At the moment she is in the Netherlands by Bram Hengeveld, our Accucraft Dealer there. He is known by a lot of customers from UK, USA, Denmark and so on and he will provide us with some nice clips from this loco. As soon as they are online I will post them here. Please have also a look at all other videos he made from my and other Accucraft projects, many thanks to him for his very good job.

Here a link to his Youtube-Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/user/MrBramMoos

Take care,

Lorenz
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
HISTORY

Starting in 1881, numerous narrow gauge lines were opened in the Kingdom of Saxony which partly showed a tilt and tortuous course. For this purpose the Royal Saxon State Railways ordered 39 small three-coupled tank locomotives from the Saxon Machine Factory in Chemnitz. 1906 five more to the private Zittau-Oybin-Jonsdorfer Railway Company (ZOJE) delivered specimens were taken over by the state railway. First, they were classified in the genus H V TK, which was changed in 1896 in K I and from 1900 in I K.

27 locomotives arrived in 1920 still in the possession of the Deutsche Reichsbahn. In 1925 they received the new numbers from 99 7501 to 99 7527. A little later, all locomotives were retired.

After First World War, five locomotives were made ​​as War reparations to Poland. During the Second World War, two of this were re-introduced into the herd of the Deutsche Reichsbahn and designated as 99 2504 and 99 2505. They arrived in 1945 to Polish Railways PKP again.

THE SAXON IK - Rebirth of a Legend

In 2006, the delivery of the first three narrow gauge locomotives of the genus IK from the Saxon Machine Factory formerly Richard Hartmann AG to the Royal Saxon State Railways has her 125th anniversary. Until 1892 a total of 44 of this small, strong, three-coupled tender locomotives leaves the factory in Chemnitz. The last locomotive of this genus was scrapped in 1964 after considerable 80 years of service in Schmiedeberg.

From 2006-2009 a unique project was realized in the Free State of Saxony: the faithful reproduction of Saxony’s first narrow-gauge locomotive. In this period, a copy of the for decades no longer existing Lokomotive Type was build from ground on new using old and new drawings. After three years of dedicated work, the IK No. 54 was officially privy on 04. July 2009 in Radebeul. Since 29.August 2009 the IK No. 54 locomotive comes to the Saxon narrow gauge railways. Railway enthusiasts and tourists enjoy the rides of the striking train with great enthusiasm.

For the small green black red painted machine were cash and in-kind donations collected valued at more than 800.000 EUR. She wears now significantly to the increasing of the tourist attractiveness of the Saxon narrow gauge railways.

About the impressive path from the idea to build a replica up to the commissioning of the final locomotive is reported in the book about the IK No. 54 and honors thus the accomplished achievements of many volunteer supporters.

The IG Preßnitztalbahn e.V. as railway transport company has taken over the complete support of the I K No. 54, also for the deployment planning (http://www.ssb-sachsen.de).

Specifications:

Scale / Gauge - 1:20.3 / 45 mm
Construction - Brass & Stainless Steel
Mini. Radius - 4 ft.
Length - 10.9 in.
Width - 3.66 in.
Height - 5.8 in.

Features:

Butane fired
Piston valve
Safety valve
Pressure gauge
Water level glass
Lubricator
Drain cocks
Spoked Wheels
 

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Lorenz, a very attractive locomotive. I have what may sound like a stupid ???. What are those devices that look like pulley wheels on the stack and the roof of the cab? and their function please? Looks like an overhead wire pick up of some kind. Thank You
 

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Lorenz, the pic you posted makes the function very clear for the locomotive, and I assume that spring device on the steam done of the locomotive is a tensioner of some kind? How did it link to the trailing cars as I thought I saw the same pulleys on the roof of the trailing car in your video. I am becoming more attracted to this loco and the braking system now that I know it's function. Just as I learned about the optional extension on the stack of the Mountaineer was used for it's braking system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hi Nick, could not find your PM, if possible send me a mail to [email protected]
About the Heberlein Brake system I need to search for some infos showing you how it works. In short: the brake line goes from the front of the loco over all cars to the end of the last car ...

Regards,

Lorenz
 

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Lorenz, the pic you posted makes the function very clear for the locomotive, and I assume that spring device on the steam done of the locomotive is a tensioner of some kind? How did it link to the trailing cars as I thought I saw the same pulleys on the roof of the trailing car in your video. I am becoming more attracted to this loco and the braking system now that I know it's function. Just as I learned about the optional extension on the stack of the Mountaineer was used for it's braking system.
Nick,
the spring device on the steam dome is the safety valve. The brake line was tensioned by a winch in the rear of the cab. Each car usually had its own piece of brake line. They were connected by snap hooks. The system was fail-safe. If the line broke, the weights pulled the wheels against the axle and the rotation tensioned the chain leading to the brake gear, applying the brakes. In the same way the brake was applied by loosening the line.
Regards
 
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