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This is a follow-on to the thread I started in the old MLS site:  http://archive.mylargescale.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=47743&whichpage=1


I've now gotten to the point where I consider the cab/water tank assembly completed and have decided to declare victory.








The next step will be to paint it with high temperature paint and it will be ready to use on my loco.


Then …  I will start on projects such as making the frames look more realistic, adding details to the boiler and Americanizing the smoke box.  There's plenty to keep me busy for a while longer on this project.


Llyn


 
 

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Llyn,
Your brass work looks great! High Temp paint is not needed. Pick any good quality paint (I use rattle cans from Walmart-Krylon, Rustoleum or Lowes-Valspar enamel) get the parts really clean, warm the parts and paint, prime well and paint a couple of coats then let dry for longer than you think it needs to before handling or decaling.
Keep up the great work,
Tom
 

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Llyn:  Very nice work.  She looks great.  Looking forward to seeing her in paint and on the rails.  Are you going to do any pin stripe?


 


Bob
 

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Interesting approach, making all the superstructure on piece. That will surely make disassembly a snap, if you ever need to do it. Lovely brasswork!
 

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Llyn,

Wonderful brasswork, I think I need to brush up on my skills! Question for you, What do you use for soldering? I was thinking some sort of resistance unit...
 

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Looks great! Can't wait to see it painted. I wouldn't worry about the "high temperature" aspect of the paint. I've always just used "regular" Krylon with no negative effects. In truth, the one time I tried using a high-temp bar-be-que paint proved to be, well, less than desirable. The darned stuff flaked right off! So I switched back to the old standby and haven't had any troubles. (One exception--the floquil paint I used on some side tanks of a pot boiler turn a bit browner as they get warm, then return to olive when cooled. Weird.)

Later,

K
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the encouraging words, folks.

Tom & Kevin,  The high temperature paint may well be overkill.  Guess I was just going with belt and suspenders on this one.  I really appreciate hearing of your experiences on this.  One interesting note; I just got a set of pop valves and a whistle from Trackside Details which I installed on the steam dome last night.  I drilled holes and soldered them in and, even though I got the dome VERY hot, the paint was not in the least damaged by the heat.  Quite remarkable, that.

Vance,  Actually this sort of modular construction was a Roundhouse creation and you are right that it makes getting the loco apart a whole lot easier than if each piece had to be installed separately.  I used the Roundhouse assembly, squared the windows and doors, added window sash, overlayed the cab sides and tanks with 0.020" brass into which I had embossed the rivet detail.  So, the original Roundhouse cab and tank assembly is all there; but, only a few square inches of the original outer surface are now exposed.

Ryan,  I am using a special, small Bernzomatic torch which I bought from Micromark:

The torch head is relatively small and is on the end of a flexible hose.  Their catalog number is 83035.  I really would like to give electric resistance soldering a try, but the equipment is awfully expensive and the small torch seems to suffice.

I should have more to post in the not-too-distant future.

Llyn
 

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Llyn,

Thanks for the info on the torch. I had forgotten they sold that one. Then again, I don't do too much for brass detail work either, but I will be changing that soon!
 

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Llyn,
I have a Graskop resistance soldering unit made by Dick Ganderton of the UK. I don't know if he still makes them, but he can be reached at:
Graskop, Dewlands Road, Verwood, Dorset, BH31 6PN
tel: 01202 822 701
e-mail: [email protected]

It was not very expensive as these things go, but I bought it when the dollar was doing better against the pound. I am very happy with it since it has several power levels and is easy to use. Contact him for more information. Also, there are a few articles on how to make your own if your are eager to try. Here is one:  http://www.trainweb.org/bristol-s-gauge/Projects/rsu.html
There was a good thread on this subject at:  http://archive.mylargescale.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=26176
 

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Llyn, Great looking work. I think brass is really fun to work with once you get the hang of it. Click the link in Vance's sinature for plans to build a resistance solderer using a battery charger. I have been having pretty good luck soldering details with a small butane torch but have considered building a resistance solderer from Vance's plans. Keep up the good work and keep us posted.
 

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When you are useing a resistance soldering unit, is it like a spot welder, or do you still use flux and solder?
If you use flux and solder is it soft solder or hard(silver) solder?
Regards
Gerald
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Hi Gerald,
Resistance soldering uses the same sorts of flux and solder one would use with a soldering iron or a torch.  Resistance soldering is unique in that the part to be soldered is heated by passing an electric current through it.
Llyn
 
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