G Scale Model Train Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
926 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
When Bachmann showed a prototype of a side door caboose a few years ago, I was stoked. This was just what I needed for my short line. Of course the caboose was a no-show and I was bummed until Bachmann and AMS introduced (among other things), a flat car. Hmmm, do ya think...?


Done. To give me an idea of what the caboose might look like a enlarged the plan view of my favorite caboose--Pacific Coast Railway number 2, which is in the California State Railroad Museum in Sacramneto, CA. I glued the plans to some cardboard and perched it atop my AMS flat. Looks like it might just work. And I already have the Evergreen scribed large-scale siding on hand.:)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
926 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, a long time ago, Dave. This was when they were first contemplating 1:20.3. Before the Shay, even. You should ask Curmudgeon. Somewhere I have clipped a story about building a styrene caboose, so I'll have to dig up the article. As I recall, you make inner walls out of horizontal siding. I really need to get up to Sacto to check out the real thing. Maybe get some interior shots and check out how the end platforms and steps are made. I am a Musuem member (heck, I belong to a lot of historical thingies), so they should just let me do my thing, right?


BTW, coupled to the Pacific Coast caboose at the museum is a neat little mogul (I think) that looks like it might be the prototype for Bachmann's Indie. Pardon me if I guessed wrong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Looks like a really cool project. Living only a couple hours north of Sacramento, I have been to the museum and seen that caboose many times. I can't wait to see more progress!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
926 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Dang, you guys are gonna force me to build that puppy!/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/shocked.gif On a lark, I bought some Evergreen quarter-round strip today in anticipation of doing the corners, which are rounded. What I need to do is get some detail shots of the end platforms and the interior. Also, I need to swap the trucks on my flat car for passenger car trucks, the kibd that are on the Connie tender. But that's way down the road. BTW, in my book on the Pacific Coast Railway, it says that "my" caboose and its twin were built on flatcar platforms, so there's a precent for everything.


Dave, I'd like to see at least one drawing of the Colorado caboose to see what I can steal. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Looks like the caboose is a little too long for the flat car frame, you might have to compress the design a little to fit the end platforms. It might be easier to scratch build a new frame.

Paul
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
926 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Negatory, Paul.  The caboose cabin is 30 feet long and the flat car is 30 ft. long. The end platforms will have to be tacked on the the flatcar frame. As I said, the real caboose wa built on a flat and to my knowledge, most cars back then were 30 footers.  Perhaps the photos don't show it clearly, but the cardboard cutout  "body" is the same length as the flatcar.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
281 Posts
Well, yeah, but a 30-foot car body would be on a 36- or 38-foot flatcar to accomodate the end platforms. I can't imagine a railroad tacking on platforms, since the end beam and draft gear underneath have to bear the pulling of the train. What does the drawing show for the length over the end beams?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
143 Posts
I have previously suggested the Pacific Coast Rwy. caboose #2 to David Fletcher as a MasterClass project. He indicated he was very interested.

I also have asked Curtiss Johnson, co-author of "The Pacific Coast Railway" if he would participate and he also expressed interest. Curt provided the drawings Bachmann used for the prototype model for their still-born project and is very interested in anything to do with the PCRwy.

I just received a Bronson-Tate laser cut wood kit for SPCRR caboose #47 and it is spectacular. I believe the PCRwy. caboose #2 would make a similarly spectacular kit / model.

This caboose would provide a great alternate to Colorado prototypes for those of us modeling freelance or west coast NG railroads. It would also complement Bachmann's new PCRwy. side door gondola.

I'll drop both David Fletcher and Curtiss Johnson a note asking if there is still interest in this becoming a MLS-MC project.

Happy RRing,

Jerry
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
926 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Jerry, this is great news. Of course, if we all build one, we will see ourselves coming and going, if you get my drift.:)


Vance, according to Curtiss Johnson's plans in "The Pacific Coast Railway," the overall lenght is 34'8", length of cabin is 29'3" . The end platforms are 2'5" each. In the view of the top/bottom of the car (it shows the roof and cupola on one half, the underside of the car on the other), the car measures out (at 3/16 of an inch to the foot) at 34.6666, which is darn near the 34'8" they cite. And yes, based on the bottom view, the end platform is part of the frame with the area where the steps go cut out up to the 1st and 4th beam, whatever it is called. In other words, of the four horizontal beams, it's not the two center ones, but the two outboard ones. Why don't ya just get the book? :D


Irregardless (as they say) I ain't making no frame. As far as I am concerned, the ends can be stuck on. I'll use extra strength glue and make sure the hack is always at the end of the train where it don't gotta pull anything behind it. Master modeler I ain't. But as it says in the book, and which I mentioned twice already, caboose number 2 and 3 were built on flatcars. You can look it up.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
937 Posts
I would love to see a caboose as a MasterClass project. Especially if you could get Bronson-Tate to laser it. Pacific Coast #2 or similar drover style woud be my preference.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,960 Posts
Posted By FH&PB on 01/04/2008 1:19 PM
Well, yeah, but a 30-foot car body would be on a 36- or 38-foot flatcar to accomodate the end platforms. I can't imagine a railroad tacking on platforms, since the end beam and draft gear underneath have to bear the pulling of the train. What does the drawing show for the length over the end beams?


It's quite common to have end platforms just added on to an existing frame. In a case like this, the draft gear would simply be dropped out and replced with longer timbers that extend out from under the platform. The platform would be built directly on top of those timbers.


Later,


K
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
926 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Vance (in particular) and anyone else who feels like they're in my sights--when I say something that sounds bitchy or nasty, it's just part of the repartee. I'm really not mad or annoyed or anything like that. Just sounding off.:D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
281 Posts
I haven't heard anything like that yet, Joe!

Kevin, are you saying they splice the extensions onto the existing frame, or they replace the center sills, or what? I'm having a hard time visualizing how one would do that and maintain the integrity of the car, but if you know of a prototype, then there's our proof.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,960 Posts
They're not spliced in. On many cars wood cars, the draft gear is actually not an integral part of the frame, but rather built into timbers that get bolted underneath the center beams of the car. This is why the coupler sits below the bottom of the car, not actually through it. It's also an inherent buffer for hard couplings. The draft gear timbers would be damaged, but could easily be dropped out and replaced with new timbers, as opposed to having to replace the center beams of the car. If a railroad were to "rebuild" a flat car to use as a caboose or such, these timbers could easily be unbolted from the car and replaced with longer timbers extending the 30" or so length of the platform.



Here's a shot of the underside of my combine, which shows how these timbers would be attached to the frame of the car. The two outboard timbers are attached to the middle longitudinal beams, and can be smaller because their only purpose is to help support the platform. They don't take any force of the coupler. On the prototype, the two beams and the coupler is one complete assembly.



On the very left side of this photo, you can see that the platform has been completely removed from the car. The four beams were unbolted from the frame, dropping the draft gear assembly and the platform. This was done evidently for transport when it was moved to Colorado, making the car around 3.5' shorter in total. The draft gear and platforms were then stored in the baggage compartment, removed when the car was cleaned out for transporting back to the EBT, then placed back inside. Ever wonder why couplers rarely adorn railfans' private collections?

Later,

K
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
926 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Wow! The stuff ya learn on this site...


But I have a question: what are the various beams called? Somewhere I have clipped an article from Finescale or Mainline Modeler that identifies each frame component using terms like "needle beam" and such. Not that it makes much difference in our discussion, but it would be nice to use industry terms rather than descriptives such as, "The skinny thingy that's next to that fat, long jobby.":D
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top