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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If an engine is running through one "block" and proceeds onto another "block" that has a lower voltage, but still fed from the same power pack (e.g., diode speed reduction over a span of tracks), the train will continue to proceed at speed produced by the higher voltage block until the last axle clears the prior block and all axles are onto the lower voltage block at which point the train will slow down.

OK, here's the $64,000 question. When the engine crosses over to the lower voltage block, with axles in each, do the axles in the lower voltage block provide ANY current to the engine? This of course assumes that the track and wheel pick-ups are all perfectly clean.
 

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OK, here's the $64,000 question. When the engine crosses over to the lower voltage block, with axles in each, do the axles in the lower voltage block provide ANY current to the engine?
I think that the minute the first pair of wheels contact the 'new' block, you essentially have a common electrical section as both blocks are now joined as on - eall the wheels are joined electrically via the track pickups. I've no idea what the power pack thinks of that! But I imagine the current flows to the motor as it always did - via the wheels with the higher voltage, which, due to the common pickup wiring, means all wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So then, an "in-rush supressor" in the lower voltage block will not/should not "manifest it's time delay/ramp up" so long as an axle is at the higher voltage. That's pretty much what I figured.
 

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I am looking at this from a very different view. My RR has many cars with front and rear rear axles connected with power. When these cross the gap the power will be the higer one for both tracks. However when the end axle passes over the gap, only the lower power goes to the train on the lower powered track. Then comes the next car with dual power pickup and once again the lower powered track now has the high powered track supply. Can we call this the seesaw effect?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I am looking at this from a very different view. My RR has many cars with front and rear rear axles connected with power. When these cross the gap the power will be the higer one for both tracks. However when the end axle passes over the gap, only the lower power goes to the train on the lower powered track. Then comes the next car with dual power pickup and once again the lower powered track now has the high powered track supply. Can we call this the seesaw effect?
There is a way around this and I do it on my observation cars. You put diodes in line between the axles and the bulb so that the power cannot go from one axle to the other but only to the bulb. Then you can even put a capacitor across the bulb and it will carry the lighting through dirty/dead track.

I have several blocks where trains stop for one reason or another and a lit car protruding into the prior block would keep the engines from stopping in the right places. This way the engines stop and the drumhead stays lit.
 
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