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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm working on a train to challenge Stan Cederleaf's little 2-2-0. I picked up a cheap New Bright set today, with that purpose in mind. First to get the chop was the caboose, since I figured it would be the easiest.


My wife said "It's cute, but what's it good for?"


No paint as yet. I didn't want to take the time for it to dry. I've got maybe 2 hours in it total, including staring at it and thinking how cute it is.
 

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Yep I'd have to agree it's cute. Yes cabooses where known as crummys or hacks. Later RJD
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks, Chris! I'm having fun, and it's jump-starting my modeling mood again.

Here's a quick photoshop kitbash idea for the engine from the same set (using a Delton cab which I have on hand)


I'm thinking this should be for the Kentucky & Carolina Railroad, and this little engine will be named KC Jr.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Posted By cjwalas on 12/22/2008 11:10 AM
Love that engine! Those proportions are a riot! Be careful of the binding on the main rod. When it's that short you can run into real problems. Can't wait to see this one finished!
Chris


Just for kicks, I finished up the photoshopbash to include the tender. I've been dabating on either a 1 or 2 axle tender - after this, I think I like 2 better.

Besides, if I'm lucky, this will leave me just enough room for the batteries in the tender, and be easier to build, to boot.
 

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2 choices.

2 axled tender, with a hinged between the loco and tender, then the loco can pivot around those 21" diameter curves I just KNOW your going to buy

or

1 axled, but then the loco and tender would need to be fused together, I suspect this may actually be the easier method
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
2 axled tender, with a hinged between the loco and tender, then the loco can pivot around those 21" diameter curves I just KNOW your going to buy


But of course! What's the point in having a super short train, if you don't have super short curves to run it on? Maybe this locomotive was developed to handle those early curves on the B&O, which only the grasshoppers could negotiate. Obviously, theu wopuld have needed something a little more modern and powerful....

1 axled, but then the loco and tender would need to be fused together, I suspect this may actually be the easier method


Easier to make work, possibly, but the chassis sure is easy to cut up as above.

I may go ahead and make it with 2 axles, and just make the whole thing rigid. Kind of a cheat, but it would be sure to prevent derailments.

In either case, the tender body has to be about the size shown above, simply to hold the batteries. I suspect that it would look better with 2 axles, although the single axle with a fake jointed drawbar would be kinda cool.
 

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Check out the thread "The Shortest Steam loco." Also for a prototype look up the C P Huntington. It had a pilot and trailing truck, but only two drivers. Unfortunately, it was standard gauge and I only model 7/8, but the 0-2-0 is an interesting concept.
Bob
 
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