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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was looking for curly-spoke wheels on the Tenmille site and found this on the "Gauge 1 Wagon Accessories" page.



G188E: American Bogie Hopper Wagon 1/32" Scale.
Supplied as an etched sheet, for body only. Suitable for Aster American Locomotives. Wheels and Bogies not supplied.

The Price list says it is £78.00 (and that the part no is G179!)
 

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Pete,

Nice find, but with the exchange rate of the falling dollar, those cars become a might bit pricey for even a train of 6! Look good though!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ryan,

I'll have to agree about the current exchange rate - I'm cheerfully spending my UK money from my UK relatives on inexpensive (to them) US model stuff.

But if/when the rate goes back to 1.5 to one or less, then these will compare favorably with Aristo or similar cars. Perhaps.
 

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Don't forget some of the Accucraft loco's are also 1/32. For my AC-12 and S-12
I'm chasing any secondhand MDC coal hoppers I can get my hands on. I picked up three the other day for $44 each, not a mark on them. A set of #820 Kadee couplers, some scruffy paint and away you go. The present count is ten hoppers.
 

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Rod
I surely enjoy those "snap together" kits that can "roll" out of the box....I remember them well!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

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For what it's worth gentlemen, Mainline America are now making the MDC smooth sided hoppers in Monon livery for $54.95 each. I think they purchased all the MDC injection moulding tooling and are slowly re-introducing the line, but they keep it a well-kept secret!

David M-K
Ottawa
 

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What you get from Tenmille (provided they are still interested in doing some etches) is a VERY basic body.......that's it. No couplers, wheels, trucks, brake cylinders, rigging/piping, decals and so on.
Having encountered the fear that soldering (minimum 80watt iron for this job) engenders in the eyes of most 'modellers' on this board I'd say they are a non-starter for 98%of you just because of that, let alone the cost of all the extras.
Go with the Mainline America jobs!

David M-K
Ottawa
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I submit that there are many factors mitigating against the production of such a model in the USA. I'll begin by stating the obvious

Tac, you certainly know how to gripe...

I would like to point out that none of your responses was 'obvious' to the majority here, as we don't have any etched kits to make - either by soldering or shake-the-box.

The important point, which you missed, is that someone who has been in 'model railways' for a few years probably has some familiarity with a soldering iron (all those pesky rail joints?,) and with glue (gotta make a trestle!) What is increasingly rare is machine tool experience.
As you correctly note, the live steam guys tend to be machinists. The rest of us get by with a vertical drill press, a dermel-style tool and a file. Oh yes, and a soldering iron. Etched kits lend themselves to this level of expertise - they are called "craftsman" kits over here, and tend towards wood rather than etched brass.

Dave Queener is working on the wheels for us EBT fans, and there is also at least one gentleman offering to make any wheels you like (for a price.) Then you can steal the wheels from an existing loco, as Dave Fletcher did for the C P Huntington. There are plenty of detail parts available - just look what folk have done with their shays!

And you can call me Pete; we've argued so often that Mr seems a bit formal. I am a Brit, btw, and I have enjoyed making locos from etched brass kits, and from white metal - still have an OO B1 Nucast in fine running order.
 
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