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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been holding out on you guys. Those of you who have been following my Pennsylvania Railroad E-6 Atlantic builders log may have noticed that no progress has been made in some time. That’s because I have started work on a 7.5” gauge porter locomotive. Like its smaller 4.75” gauge little sister, it will be powered by electricity. Two bicycle motors form electricscooterparts.com will power it. I would like to build a live steam loco some day but I just don’t have the patience right now and I wanted something that would be easy to operate.
The photos below illustrate my progress so far. Joel




 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No track yet, but I did just join a local club that has a temporary track and we expect to have permission from the city of Santa Rosa to build a permanent track in a local park.
 

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Very cool!
But why the change of gauge? I have kept the smaller project in the back of my head and hopefully one of these years I will build my own ride on. Could the motor for this project fit in the 4 3/4" locomotive?
Can'r wait to watch the progress on this one as well!
Matt
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I changed gauge because it seems like there are more clubs out there that support 7.5” than 4.75”. I initially chose 4.47 because I was planning on building a short loop of track on my property and the smaller trains allowed for tighter turns. Now that I’m in a club, it makes more sense to build bigger for the club track.
The 4.75 inch porter that I build is powered by a windshield wiper motor and has enough power to pull me in a gondola and a caboose as well, but it is underpowered on grades and could use a larger motor. Eventually it will use the same bicycle motor as the larger version will use.
http://www.electricscooterparts.com/images/MOT-24250Gb.jpg
Also, below is the web site where I get my parts like electronic speed controls and throttles. These prices are much lower than some of the large scale manufactures.
http://www.electricscooterparts.com/motors.html

another link to perk your intrest:
http://www.ne.jp/asahi/beat/non/loco/loco0e.html
 

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Beautiful!

That's what I was planning to do at our place in Eldorado Township with Caleb and Ethan.
 

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I am trying to figure out a way to afford this one day. They say the pieces go together like a swiss watch!
Looks like an aster kit, just alot bigger.


http://livesteamparts.com/new_page_1.htm
http://livesteamparts.com/cgi-bin/online/storepro.php

Then build one from scratch using one of my 7.5" gauge club members garage equipment, huge mill and lathe!


Sorry if this is somewhat off topic, One of my passions is to own one of these beautys and I wanted to share it.

Andrew
 

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Andrew,

The brakes are a very good idea for riding cars. I was at Train Mountain this summer with a friend that had no brakes on his cars. All braking was done by slowly putting the engine in reverse. His Diesel engine was hydraulic so braking this way does not hurt it as long as you don't spin the wheels backwards. I had the opportunity to run another train that had brakes under the engineers car and what a difference that made.
 

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Yes this is a very impressive gage to go to if one has the room. I spent last weekend at my brothers and we Layed 80 ft of track to the existing RR and finally got to run a train. We have a KCS F unit that operates on battery and has a Phoneix sound system in it plus a 0-4-0 side rod diesel 44 tonner. Will go back next spring to help lay more track. Later RJD
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The drive wheel castings showed up a couple of weeks ago and I have been hard at work making the chips fly on my lathe. The wheels are about 6” in diameter which is about the maximum my lathe can handle. These take a long time to turn and it’s definitely been a learning experience. Now all I have to do is machine thee more to the same tolerances. No easy feat for a guy who usually goes by “the ten foot rule” (if it looks good from ten feet away, than it’s OK).


 

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Joel,

Did you paint the wheel before turning, or after? Also, I was under the impression that the usual method for turning a set of wheels like this would be to do each machining step on all of the castings before moving on to the next step, thus ensuring that they are all identical even when your measurements are off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I painted the wheel after turning, and yes, it probably would have been better to follow each machining step on each wheel but that would eliminate all of the adrenalin and excitement that comes from the possibility of screwing up a $55.00 part.
Dang-it why didn’t I think of that!!!
 

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No need to worry! Just machine the rest of the wheels to match, then take a very light cut off of all 4 to make sure they are identical.

Also, if you paint before turning, then maybe you won't have to worry about masking? I really don't know whether or not it's a good idea to turn a painted part like that, but if it's ok, that's one less step to bother with.
 

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You made a mistake. This is "LARGE SCALE" not "HUEMONGGUS LARGE SCALE"

Keep posting pictutres I would like to see your progress.

Seeing your Machining pic's could be applied to Large Scale some where along the way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have a little more progress to report on.
The first task completed was to get the drive wheels quartered. I did this by building a simple plywood jig to hold the wheels in the proper position while they are being quartered.
The wheels may not be at exactly 90 degrees, but because both sets were done on the same jig the error will be the same on both and because this is an electric locomotive, I do not have to worry about valve timing.

The second project was to make some blocks to hold the axle bearings.

Finlay, I was able to borrow a friend’s Mig welder to weld up the side frames.

I have also fabricated some frame spaces but have not gotten any photos of them yet. I hope to get these installed this week and get some photos.
Joel
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
A little more progress to report on the Porter.
The bearing blocks are in place complete with springs and the motor mounts have been fabricated and installed. This locomotive will be powered by two bicycle motors from electricscooterparts.com.
I should have a running chaises very soon.




Joel
 
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