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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have 42 of these wheel sets (a wheel set consist of 2 wheels and one axle) and I will sell them for $4.50 each plus shipping or the entire lot for $150.00 plus shipping. Most are black and none are shiny. They are in excellent condition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Of the 42 wheel sets, 12 are of one type and 30 are of another type. I will list sizes with the first number the 12 group and the second number the 30 group.

  1. tread diameter - 1.153 1.129
  2. tread width - .200 .167
  3. flange depth - .060 .035
  4. flange thickness - .073 .061
  5. back to back - 1.572 1.568
I don't know the brands as they came from cars where I needed to substitute Bachmann wheel sets to give me more flange. These wheels looked great, but I have too many tight turns to use low profile flanges.
 

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I'm guessing Gary Raymond wheels, only guy who made anything approaching fine scale.
Not quite. Gary Watkins (Sierra Valley) made very nice ones. Jason at The Train Dept now has the business and sells them. They look like this.



But they don't have the curved dish front, so maybe they are Gary Raymond. Ah yes - an old pic from LSC - Gary's wheels on the right.



Your pic:



The silvery ones don't look very fine scale. More like regular Bachmann wheels.
 

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Actually the silver ones look like the ill-fated accucraft attempt with the huge radius at the base of the flange. Pretty unique.

They did not work well and many people got rid of them... the idea that the huge radius would self center better... it actually was so severe that the wheels wandered side to side terribly.

I'll still vote for Gary Raymond on the top one, I believe he used steel axles, not stainless. (thus the rust)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Greg, do you think these silver ones could be pretty decent wheels if I were to take most of the radius away on the lathe. The only place I can see to get hold of them is to hold the shoulder of the protruding axle in the chuck. Are these wheels just likely to spin on the axle when cutting pressure is applied? I'm not sure of exactly how the axle is attached to the wheels. Jim
 

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Yeah, definitely hard to hold in a lathe. I would guess you would have to make a mandrel to hold the wheels, and that would require pressing the insulator out. They are a press fit and not a lot of resistance to spinning on the axle or insulator.

I really think if you did not do it that way, even with light cuts you would spin the wheel on the insulator/axle and damage it (melt plastic).

It's a tough one.

Greg
 

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They are a press fit and not a lot of resistance to spinning on the axle or insulator.
I have never had a problem removing wheels from axles (getting them back straight is the bigger issue!) With the wheel off, you can put a shaft/bolt through the hole with a washer or two to hold the face of the wheel. Then chuck the bolt from the back of the wheel and you shouldn't damage anything. I use a power drill and a file for this kind of thing, but a lathe would work.

Note that most loco builders have a special tool that makes the profile of the wheel. Here's Bill Allen's at work:

 
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