G Scale Model Train Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
445 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
One of my earlier wood builiding starts to fall apart one at a time. I want to replicate that building with plastic materials. I wonder if there is a place where we can order do 3d printing of plastic panels based on our blue print?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,042 Posts
See Shapeways, they will tell you the kind of file to submit.
John
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
433 Posts
You can design your building from plans on <tinkercad.com>. Then the completed files can be sent to a 3D printing company (Shapeways is one, but pretty expensive). That company can print the files in any number of materials, including both PLA and ABS plastics, metals, resin, etc. To prevent warping with PLA, make the walls at least 8 MM thick.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
445 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
You can design your building from plans on <tinkercad.com>. Then the completed files can be sent to a 3D printing company (Shapeways is one, but pretty expensive). That company can print the files in any number of materials, including both PLA and ABS plastics, metals, resin, etc. To prevent warping with PLA, make the walls at least 8 MM thick.

Thanks for the site, I can learn how to use cad from that website; I may learn how to draw panel with windows and send out for laser cutting service instead of 3D printing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
512 Posts
Mate, several options available - 3d print, laser cut, resin casting. Depends on size, complexity and area needed to copy / refurbish. Shapeways is good. So is lasercutting services. You may be able to find a community hub or collective to do budget priced cutting / 3d printing. Good luck and would like to see progress pics too. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
I'm finding 3d printing (in the fused filament reprap desktop sense) very useful for functional but less seen mechanisms like coupler spacers, and even an ongoing effort to re-engineer and quiet the gearbox housing of a Christmas train (the internal crosshatch fill means it won't resonate like the thin plastic molding). But I think it's iffy for decorative things, unless you want a rough texture or are prepared to do a lot of filling and painting.

The laser sintered and photopolymer methods may be better for detail add-ons, but probably cost prohibitive for buildings above say HO or N scale.

With a laser cutter you can do a lot in thin plywood, including potentially some engraving, but permissibility of plastics will depend on if the cutter has ventilation to outside as the result of burning many of them is pretty nasty - commercial services providers can probably handle that, machines in hackerspaces, craft shops, etc may have usage rules against it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
428 Posts
To replicate buildings that were once made of wood I recommend saw cutting your pieces from 1/4" thick clear acrylic. Fairly economical, when compared to 3D printing or even LASER cutting and they will last a lifetime. The secret is to glue the pieces together properly using Acrylic Solvent Cement. It really helps to watch a couple of the TAP Plastics Videos on building boxes.... "How to Glue Acrylic" and "How to Build a Box with Plastic." You can find the videos here.

Using acrylic also gives you the added benefit of being UV resistant so the windows stay clear. Wait the surfaces with automotive etching primer first and then paint with exterior house paint. We've found that this combination will last for many, many years.

Russ Miller
TAP Plastics Manager since 1980
2016 NGRC Chairman
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
445 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
To replicate buildings that were once made of wood I recommend saw cutting your pieces from 1/4" thick clear acrylic. Fairly economical, when compared to 3D printing or even LASER cutting and they will last a lifetime. The secret is to glue the pieces together properly using Acrylic Solvent Cement. It really helps to watch a couple of the TAP Plastics Videos on building boxes.... "How to Glue Acrylic" and "How to Build a Box with Plastic." You can find the videos here.

Using acrylic also gives you the added benefit of being UV resistant so the windows stay clear. Wait the surfaces with automotive etching primer first and then paint with exterior house paint. We've found that this combination will last for many, many years.

Russ Miller
TAP Plastics Manager since 1980
2016 NGRC Chairman
Russ,
Thanks for the information, I will read and learn during the holidays. I contact a company in Nevada and they have laser cutting service. I sent the a sketch and request to cut on plexiglass. Initially, I tried to renovate, when I look into it, the buildings were built on layers of wood, and the problem of that is when water get in they cannot get out and quickly deteriorate the wood. So I decided to collect the window frames and other parts and scrap it off and replace the body with plexiglass. That is the plan, let see how things develop, particularly, I have to use a plastic frame to mimic the brick when we spray on the platform. But I don't know how strong spray paint can stick to plexiglass; that is the issue I have to get some information with during the holidays.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top