G Scale Model Train Forum banner
1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay so it's not a steam shovel but it's close. It's the 1:25 scale Bantam gas shovel that Spec Cast released a few years back. I love cable driven shovels so I bought one. For some reason my creative synapses didn't fire for the first year I had the thing but then I saw an article in Narrow Gauge and Shortline Gazette about modifying the shovel into something better for 1:20.3 scale. I really liked the overall idea, but the gentleman who wrote the article did some things differently than I would have, such as using styrene for his mods, whereas I prefer to use actual wood and metal whenever possible. So I thought I would respectfully steal his idea but do things a little differently.

The first items that had to change were the color and the modern style cab. The Bantam shovels and cranes apparently were a bright pumpkinn orange color I wanted something a bit more muted for my model so i chose dark gray.



Here the shovel sits atop the lazy suzan that I painted it on. In front of it are some of the parts that were removed for painting such as the control custer, counterweight, various transmission covers, etc.



The old seat (top) will be replaced with the nice cast brass tractor seat. The brass will be blackened.



For a bit of cotrast I painted the six cylinder gas engine green. It took a couple hours because I had to go back and touch up all the ignition wires, belts and hoses.



Front view of the engine. I also painted one of the battery terminals red. The primary transmission guard is in the foreground.



The secondary transmission gears were painted a color called cast coat iron. These gears actually mesh and rotate when the winches operate.



The new cab is framed out in mahogany boards that were cut to scale on my table saw.



Here you can see the size comparison of the new cab on the shovel and the cab on the dragline, which is stock, except for the weathering.


I did cut enough parts to make the same modifications to the dragline.


I have even more progress to show I cut siding for the new cab and I installed roofing which is made from real corrugated steel. Those photos will come soon! Thanks for looking. Comments welcome.


Regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
Great job, I can't wait to see the rest!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
430 Posts
Eric,
That's my kind of project!
Looking great, bring on the rest of the pictures.
That big new cab would look really great with a boiler and a couple
of cylinders in there

Later
Rick Marty
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
That looks great Eric! I may have to get one of those shovels and try my hand at making one. Keep us posted as the construction continues.

Aaron
Loyet Logging Company
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,696 Posts
Eric,

Very, very nice-looking machine. Thanks for taking time to post the pixes. I too want one of those--as Rick Marty said--with a boiler, etc. You've done an inspiring job.

Les
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the feedback-- always appreciated.  cylinders and a boiler are a cool idea.  Indeed this would be an ideal platform for those wishing to make a static model of a steam shovel.  I have a couple "secret" negotiations and parts gathering going on right now that pertain to steam shovels, and all I will say is this; any steam machine in my collection for the foreseeable future will strictly be powered by actual live steam only. Call it a self imposed rule.  Currently I have no such rule for gassers and dismals-- so back to the gas shovel!  

There has been some progress and things are shaping up on the shovel so lets get down to business.

Before I made any further progress I headed over to the market and picked up a can of corn-- that's right, a can of corn.  I needed it to finish the project.


 
If you cant figure it out the corn was used to make the roof-- well the CAN at least, the corn is now on the dinner table.   Here you can also see the siding I cut for the new cab.  It is made from 1/16" basswood with 1/8" scribes.  I stained it to match the mahogany.  The stain is dilute artist acrylic paint.  I stained both sides to minimize warping, let it dry for twenty minutes then sandwiched the pieces between layers of newspaper and placed two of my heaviest books on top overnight to make sure they were flat.

 
Here is the inside view of the cab roof.  The mahogany sure is purdy.  The corrugated steel from the can is attached to the frame by the small 0-80 through bolts.


With the siding installed it was time for paint and blackening the metal parts.

 
Fresh from the paint shop!  I still have several parts to install and lots of detailing and weathering but there is really a sense of where I am headed with the build now.  The shovel has much more of the look of a early gas model now.  And looks totally appropriate withe a 20.3 figure.

 
I think this guys is thinking: "where am I going to sit while running that thing?"


All I have to say is; have patience my tiny plastic friend.


Regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,500 Posts
Sumptin is missin! Minor detail on a model (I didn't even notice the first 5 or 6 times I looked at the pics), kind of important detail on a real one... There's nothing connected to the intake manifold! no downpipe with the throttle butterfly, no carburetor, no governor on that hump on the timing cover, no fuel tank either. Kind of odd that they included plug wires but forgot that stuff.

Maybe the scrappies got it while it was sitting unguarded?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,696 Posts
Very nice piece of work. The corn can worked out great. I wish I knew how to save this thread, so many good pointers here. I want to build a ditcher as soon as I can get started with anything. Thanks again for the pixes.

Les
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,696 Posts
MiK,

C'mon, dude. Ya gotta use a little imaginashon! Rivet countin (or carb 'n whatnot) ain't cool. That's a diesel with a foot throttle. Them're fuel injecter hoses, and the fuel tank is out of th' picther on account of the angel of the camera. I know th' man said it was 'gazoline'. But hey, he mighta meant to say 'diezel' and coud'nt spell it, (not ever body cn rite 'n spel gude like me) and so he rote down 'gazoline' by misteak. That's a easy misteak to make.



Les
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the comments folks. Dave, I can't take credit for the can material idea. I actually got that idea from someone on the Seven Eights Lounge who used it for a euro style boxcar roof. It works good for things like shovel or steam tractor roofs because in the USA they were mostly corrugated steel that was also curved. Mik, the butterflies have all migrated south for winter, the governor was kicked out of office, and the shovel is on a no-carb diet. ;-) as for the fuel tank it was always in the cards and it will be making it's appearance approximately now-ish. Essentially I am pretty satisfied with the detail on the little engine that will spend it's life tucked away in the shadowy recesses of the shovel cab-- especially given the fact that the entire engine is only 1.5" long.

On to the progress photos.



Some various new metal parts: counterweight on the left, Rear floor extension in the center, new floor plates in the back and exhaust pipe, tractor seat, bucket release pulley on the right.


A close up of some of the new brass bits. My pal Henner machined the little pulley for me. the little doughnut shaped thing is a standoff for the base of the tractor seat. The exhaust pipe is a brass tube that I bent and cut. All parts were chemically blackened.


Henner also made this cool little bucket release handle for me.


Here you can see the new floor plates and the rear floor extension installed. The plates are steel which allows me to magnetically attach figures and clutter like tool boxes and gas cans.


Here is the new fuel tank installed on the rear floor extension. I rifled through my scrap bin and found two plastic headlights from an old MDC Big Hustler body. I glued them together and added a gas cap and fuel line.


Another view of the floor extension. It is bolted on with 1-72 screws. I'm thinking I need some sort of screen or guard on that radiator.


Here you can see the tractor seat installed and also how the new floor plates not only cover the screw holes that were for the original cab but they widen the floor to match the width of the new wood cab frame. All of this fits snugly inside the new wooden bodywork.




A few notes and observations about the project so far:


Painting the chassis assembly was a bit of a pain because there are so many nooks and crannies on this thing that I kept finding orange paint shining through in little spots here and there. Next time I will brush paint into the crevices and spray the rest. I typically avoid brush painting because I hate brush strokes in the paint on a good model.



I am always an advocate of bolting things together with scale hardware. It has been really nice to be able to take the cab on and off in various stages of the project. It is easily done by removing four 1-72 hex screws. Regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,500 Posts
Eric, I wasn't trying to bust your chops over it. Like I said, I didn't even notice at first. If I had a spare updraft carb here, I'd send it to you for free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,113 Posts
That is fantastic.

I have a similar crane (excavator), but have always wanted to paint it yellow like the one in the linked photo below:

Crane Train

How hard was it to disassemble the crane? Was it riveted or screwed together?

Also what brand/type of paint did you use? Spray paints? Airbrushed?

And I hear you about finding orange paint in the nooks. That's what has been keeping me from painting mine, well that it's a pretty nice looking model with all of the logos and such factory applied.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
281 Posts
Dang, Eric. I kept waiting for an Ozark donkey engine boiler to appear where that gas-burner sits. Oh, well, it's still a terrific model!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Not a problem Mik.  To be honest I wouldn't know where to install an updraft carb if I had one-- I think the last time I saw a carburetor was on my 1987 Mazda pickup, and even then I probably had no idea what I was looking at.  I suspect you know your way around IC engines better than me. 
Thanks Vance, like I said, for me steamers have got to be real or nothing. ;-) 


Matt, removing the old cab is not that difficult.  I think there are two (or three?) screws on the underbelly that can be accessed by rotating the crawler base out of the way.  Carefully remove the body.  I snapped a small part that one of the ropes attaches to, so I emphasize taking it easy while removing the body.  In the end it is a pretty easy task though.  I wanted to remove the cluster of levers and it is attached with rivets so they needed to be drilled out.


OK so lets get back to business.  I had thought about having Stan make me some decals but last night I found several of my old sheets of dry transfers and I thought "what the heck, I'll take a stab at lettering it with those."


The results are pretty good.  I discovered when the job was almost done that a ballpoint pen makes the best burnishing tool for rubbing em down, but if anybody has any tips pertaining to dry transfers I would love to hear them because the job was not easy.


 
In my research of Marion and Erie shovels they usually were lettered with both the manufacturer name and the company that owned the shovel.  Since I heavily modified the look of the shovel I thought I would fictionalize the manufacturer name as well.

 
On the left side of this image you can see the bucket release chain hanging from the new little pulley. 

 
A look at the operators seat. 


And now some overall views.  I guess you could call these builders photos because it wont look this new for long-- the next step is weathering.

 


 

 

 


Thanks for looking.



Regards,
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
Eric - where did you obtain the small nuts and bolts? Over here we CAN get BA n&b, right down to 14BA, but the price is horrendous - hence my use of Ozard products where there won't be any dismantling again.

BTW - what a great project this is, and with such excellent images to show how you did it - congrats are in order.

Best

tac
www.ovgrs.org
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,500 Posts
These are Stromberg carbs on a Stutz and a Paige. Not the easiest to make, but the most visually interesting (weird shapes and shiney brass). Moot point since yours is hidden, but I thought I'd show it in case somebody else (like me) eventually decides to build one... just to save time searching

http://cll.hemmings.com/story_image/100428-500-0.jpg
http://cll.hemmings.com/story_image/42010-500-0.jpg


This is a Zenith... easier to build, more prevalent in the real world, but less fun to look at
http://www.foleyengines.com/Images/UserDir/zenith_carburetor.jpg

I sometimes forget that I'm (un)luckier than most, my grandfather was a Case tractor dealer for 30+ years, a charter member of the local antique farm machinery club -- and complete mechanical whiz. My father is a master mechanic.... So I've been around this old junk all my life.
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top